Custom Rover

TukTuk
edited March 2014 in Rover
Well just spent the last 3 weeks on my custom Rover, wanted to do some touring this summer and the only plus for the Rover stock was that it will carry 400lbs so do not need a trailer. On the down side the drive train on the stock Rover was not up to the task, for many miles one needs many gears and so this is what has been done, on the front I put a derailleur post and a front derailleur a triple chain ring with 22-32-42 this will give me gear inches from 12.9 to 76.4 on the back there is a new wheel with a free hub and 8 speed cassette 11-34 I made custom idlers and they have 2 bearings each very smooth and work well, the whole drive train front and back shift real nice. This Rover is now ready to tour and has a gear for any terrain that I will encounter.
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Comments

  • last photo
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  • Now you should start a business selling these parts as a kit...... nice job.
  • Thank you Captainbob
    The drive train is so smooth and quiet, hope it gives me many miles of fun.
  • Tuk wrote:
    Thank you Captainbob
    The drive train is so smooth and quiet, hope it gives me many miles of fun.

    That's alot of work designing something like that. I could never do it.
  • Please do not sell yourself short, I have read your posts and you are not a stupid man, most of your post are not opinions they are backed up facts on the workings of most common bike components, again thanks for your input, the idlers are made from common hardware parts with bearings the ends do not move just the center, I could not get common idlers to float so this is what I came up with.
  • Classy setup. How much extra did you put into the Rover past stock?

    This would be a desirable setup for me as well. Not been having much luck on two-wheels - yet would miss the hill & trail gears on a triple chain ring. Don't have a Rover yet, but am working on acquiring one.

    ¬ ITL
  • Total cost from stock was $300.00 plus my time and it is well worth it.


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  • Tuk wrote:
    Total cost from stock was $300.00 plus my time and it is well worth it.


    IMG_0270.jpg thumbsup_zpsf371ab0c.gif

    That's one sexy Rover! inlove_zps4d411bb1.gif


    Say, what pedaling system do you use? Looks like bear claws you have on there.

    ¬ ITL
  • The pedals are Shimano flat on one side and clip in on the other side, want to get eggbeaters next to get more float and I think that with eggbeaters there could be less chance of theft of the trike.
  • Tuk wrote:
    The pedals are Shimano flat on one side and clip in on the other side, want to get eggbeaters next to get more float and I think that with eggbeaters there could be less chance of theft of the trike.

    Float, it seems is the new pedal buzzword, Rather than looking for more float which actually decreases pedaling efficiency it is far better to properly align the cleats on the shoes and leave float to a minimum. The idea is to get your toes and knees set up in a neutral position this can be slightly different for each person. Most hardcore riders crank the pedals down and eliminate float entirely in search of more pedaling power and efficiency. So spending extra cash on more floaty pedals is cool if you just like to spend money but properly adjusting your current pedals is free and will increase efficiency and knee health. By the way, the Subtalar joint in your ankle(the one that lets you turn your toes in a circle) offers the highest quality float of all so if your pedals/shoes are neutral and your knees don't hurt, all is well.
  • Float requirement depends on the rider, and in general, float can be more important for recumbent riders than with upright bike riders. With an upright bike the body sits on two pivot points, the pedals and the seat, so it's easy for the body to align itself. Recumbent seats are more restrictive and the body does not move. Therefore any inherent twisting caused by leg extension has to be relieved at the pedal, or the twisting can cause knee pain.

    This is an area where I'm knowledgeable because I have the issue. As I pedal my right foot floats from about the 12:00 position to the 1:00 position with each stroke. Even more on long rides when I'm tired. I went to an orthopedic sports doctor years ago due to knee pain while cycling. I took my Ryan Vanguard recumbent to his office and set it up on his trainer. He watched how I walked, how I rode, and then gave recommendations. We discussed the issue I was having and he mentioned that around 30% of the people he sees have a rotation issue like mine. That's not 30% of bike riders, but 30% of bike riders that have knee or hip pain that have chosen to go to the doctor. So I don't know what percentage of the population has the problem. When making pedal recommendations to others I mention that SPD pedals have minimal float and that their float is not high quality compared to some other brands. SPD pedals have been around for a long time and they can be cheap, so yes, you would end up spending more money on pedals with more float, but that is the only real downside for the average recumbent rider, and there's the potential for them to be better for some riders knees.

    For me dumping the SPDs and getting Beebop pedals, adding extensions between the pedals and crank arms, and putting plastic wedges between the cleats and sole of my shoe to change the angle worked for me. I can still have knee discomfort when pushing too hard up a hill, so I just use lower gears. I would like to point out that I only have knee issues when riding a recumbent. I have standard pedals and wear running shoes when riding my mountain bike, which gives absolutely no float, and I don't experience knee pain even when climbing. About a year ago I walked 26 miles and although I had sore muscles the next day, I didn't have any knee pain.

    I'm sure there are plenty of people that will get along just fine with SPD pedals, even on a Recumbent, but I believe there's a significant number of people that could benefit from greater float. For an average recumbent rider just getting started with clip type pedals, other than spending a little more money, there's very little down side to buying pedals with more float. If a person already has SPDs, and they are not experiencing discomfort, then there's really no need to change.

    As for minimal float being better of performance cycling, I'm not educated in that area since my riding has always been primarily commuting and riding for fitness. I've not been overly concerned about the weight and efficiency of my bikes since a little more weight on the bike just means a little more healthy exercise for me. :-) I tend to carry around extra water bottles and stuff that I might not really need, while performance riders replace stock bolts with titanium versions to save a few grams. Just depends on one's riding goals. A commuter may love having a kickstand, while a racer refers to a kickstand as an "anchor". There's a lot of different bikes and riders in the world. To each their own!

    Rob
  • When choosing a clipless pedal system you'll want to consider float, and the type of float: recentering or non-recentering. "During the pedal stroke, feet follow their natural path, eliminating knee strain. Float improves pedaling efficiency by coaching you to a smoother pedal stroke. Some pedal systems use recentering float in which a spring centering action forces your feet into an unnatural riding position. Non-recentering, or "free float" allows your feet to find the most comfortable station."
  • Tuk wrote:
    When choosing a clipless pedal system you'll want to consider float, and the type of float: recentering or non-recentering. "During the pedal stroke, feet follow their natural path, eliminating knee strain. Float improves pedaling efficiency by coaching you to a smoother pedal stroke. Some pedal systems use recentering float in which a spring centering action forces your feet into an unnatural riding position. Non-recentering, or "free float" allows your feet to find the most comfortable station."

    Excess float does not improve efficiency. Anything that introduces play into the system decreases efficiency, power, and wastes energy. As Rob stated he needs a rather complicated setup to ensure knee health no two of us are alike and float is essential to his proper setup but for many float is irrelevant as a little time and effort will yield a setup free of excess float and healthy for the knees. I found that setup for me at least to be easier but slightly different for the TT trikes. I needed the cleats to be turned slightly so that my heels were a bit further out for the best comfort/performance. Any system that forces your feet into an unnatural or painful position is either setup incorrectly or not appropriate for that particular person. All of this cycling stuff wether Trikes or bikes is not that complicated but vendors need a hook to sell products and we as consumers, especially dudes, love gadgets and tech. To each his own, but learning how to properly setup your machine for the best performance and health is free.
  • For the most part I do not disagree with comments about my posts and am not now like you said to each his own, am glad that moving your cleats made you more comfortable. I also have moved my cleats for more power as most pros are doing now which is to move them back toward the arch of the foot, this works the Quadriceps rather then the knee, and as far as float goes I think it would be nice to be able to have enough float that your foot could rest on the pedal in a natural place while pedaling.
  • Tuk wrote:
    I also have moved my cleats for more power as most pros are doing now which is to move them back toward the arch of the foot, this works the Quadriceps rather then the knee, and as far as float goes I think it would be nice to be able to have enough float that your foot could rest on the pedal in a natural place while pedaling.

    No doubt, and taking the time to properly set the angle of each cleat will for the vast majority do that. I also like the cleats pretty far back on my foot as a result of all those years in extra long toe clips. My point is that all these new systems and the marketing hype do not replace a well setup machine. The trikes are no exception, I found the seat position to be particularly critical for a smooth pedaling action and transferring the power to the wheels. One another note nice job on your conversion looks very well done.
  • Thank you for the comment on what I have done with the Rover, it has been an uphill battle as I want to tour with it and with it able to carry 400lbs means no trailer, then there was the gearing I spin at 80rpm and I have about 10lbs of push at the pedal at that rpm if I spin at 85rpm I spin out this 10lbs push I try to maintain in all gears hence I can go many miles and stay fresh, with the gear inches of 12.9 to 76.4 at the end of the day...50 miles I can cruse at 15mph and with the low gear for hills I can spin most at 5mph so by the end of the day I average between 7 to 8mph and still feel good. And yes cleats back is the way to go once I moved mine back I felt no pressure at the knee any more. I have a 70 year old engine and need all the help I can get.

    Take Care Spin Fast Spin Light
  • If you want to increase your cadence consider doing Spinning binges/intervals. They are not fun but do work very well to up the cadence you are comfortable with. Find a deserted road that is slightly uphill 1/4 mile or so. Pick a gear you can easily spin out. Crank up the hill as fast as you can shoot for 110rpm do 10 reps. Doing this once or twice a week will train your legs to a higher cadence and eventually you should be able to hold a cadence of 140 or so. At that point spinning at 80 will seem slow. One caveat, tadpole trikes are prone to pedal steer so results may be limited.
  • Thanks will try that
  • Very Well done!

    Did you fabricate the rear deraliuer hanger ? Could you possibly post a close up of the front deraliuer post? I've been considering some thing like this too.
    Bill
  • Yes I made the rear derailleur hanger from 3/16th flat bar the tap for it was the hard thing to find m10 x 1.0 the front post I bought from Utah Trikes, the chain idlers are hand made with 2 bearing in each one just the center revolves and the chain moves across and back as you change gears.
  • Can you give me details how you made the front post? Thinking about getting a SRAM dual drive with a 11-34 9speed
  • Tuk:
    What is the diameter of the derailleur post you used.  Utah trikes doesn't carry them anymore,

    TheDuke
  • Elrique64
    I currently have a PVC post (of sorts) on my Rover, but had to make it of larger tube to get the strength needed.  Even that is having strength problems, and mounting stuff to the larger tube is interesting, to say the least.  So I thought I would enlist the aid of a grandson to weld one up, but I don't know the diameter the standard tube is supposed to be.  Do you know?    

    TheDuke
  • Thanks for the info.
  • can anybody tell me any info on how the ider wheels was made part numbers or any thing identifying what parts are used, the mounting bracket aint no biggie, i already have rear derailluer and front derailluer  with triple chainrings, 
  • The Altus is down to $31.74 now.

    I'm curious about the front post: What's the angle for the weld between the flat plate and the round post?
  •   @Tuk That is one sexy trike! Even after all this time. Wished I had that setup. Really I do! /jealous

    ¬ ITL
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