OEM Upgrades Available on first order?

edited August 2013 in Rover
Which upgrades are available and/or recommended for a Rover?

Am 350# currently and probably would get the wider handles. Was considering a 26" wheel upgrade over Nexus 8 - but can do that later on too?

Had lost 45# on my 22 year old Specialized Rockhopper, though I am really pushing the load capacity of a CroMo 18" frame. Had a couple of mishaps, one dealing with slippery Bontrager LT3 Hardcase Ultimate tires which had been recently replaced with Specialized Hemisphere Armadillo. Am very pleased with the Hemisphere Armadillo and would use one with a 26" Rover Wheel upgrade without hesitation - should 65 PSI be adequate for a trike tire?
Other mishap was going down a 4% grade single-track that I did not know. Tackled the mountain and broke left shoulder. At 51 should of known better - mind of 25 year old with a body of a dinosaur.

Will still ride two-wheels up until the time I get converted over to three-wheels. Shoulder rehabilitation is (not) going to be fun. Makes me wonder at how much I can do on an urban converted MTB since will have a lot of weight on arms/handlebar. Rover would be far superior.


Had started riding again at 50+ & have a foot disability from the Air Force. Riding is way easier than walking. Kept my original Rockhopper from 2 decades ago.
Used to commute with to Kaiser Hospital in North Sacramento, as I worked graveyard Security there. Started a fad back then, rode due to car breaking down and wanted to keep my job. Others saw it as a fitness thing - which it did help. Eventually the hospital installed outside bicycle storage lockers.
Started at 385# and got down to a plateau of 350# when I got over my head. Should of changed original plan of riding up the Weiser River Trail grade from Council, ID to the Evergreen campground - then turn back. Hindsight. :lol: Now have a month (or longer) to contemplate the Rover experience.


Money is a factor, but I wanted to know what optional upgrades are available from TerraTrike HQ. Have read that a mesh seat is available, yet do not see how to upgrade & get the price differentials.

We have an overpass here that really cuts into one's velocity. Going over the Snake River from Idaho into Oregon can get to 27 MPH on Rockhopper easily. Imagine going back over that grade!
Can tell you that 99.9% of the riders stop 2 or more times going over the bridge, and just about everyone takes a break after crossing it.
Occasionally see people walking their bikes across that ornery bridge. Not sure how the Rover would perform on these local obstacles - and whether the Nexus 8 on 20" wheel would be more advantageous over a 26" wheel upgrade or not.

There are no recumbent anything here in the Payette, ID to Onatio, OR area. We have more hospitals going in (St. Lukes & St. Alphonsis) that support some local road cyclists - complete with riding shorts & jerseys. The area is ripe with retired folk, doctors, nurses, car salesmen, dentists, ect. & people of all ages. Not sure what impact recumbents would make here.
Tried talking Joe, owner of Eastern Oregon Cycles, into becoming a dealer. He's young but does not thing recumbents would sell here. And the closest dealers are Portland, OR or Post Falls, ID which is more of a 12+ hour drive one-way. There isn't even a dealer in Boise, ID of all places!
Would like very much to be part of planting the 'recumbent trike' seed here. I bet it would catch on!


Only recumbent experience I had was a single-speed Brike, from the early 1990's. It's biggest flaw was a very low center of 8" from the ground. Trying to take a hill the boom of the Bike would bend over like you had caught a tuna! It did okay except on rapid declines. Leaned to steer and coaster brakes... 2 wheels angled in back with power wheel up front.

So the 8 speed model would offer better gear options from pulling on my riding experience. Will miss the triple chain-rings though, especially on hills & hardpack trails.


What other options or upgrades would you more experienced people recommend?



PS: Has Eric Larsen taken TerraTrike up on their offer? He does not see himself as a polar celebrity, but search engines disagree. He's a great fella, hope he does get a TerraTrike on Antarctica: and want an autographed photo when he does.

¬ ITL

Comments

  • I'm not a heavy Rover owner so I can't speak from experience, but given your weight, and the overpass climb that you mentioned, it would probably be best to forget about a 26 inch rear wheel. A larger wheel would raise the overall gearing. Even running a 20 inch rear wheel with an 8 speed hub might not give you a low enough gear to climb comfortably.

    If you would like to do some homework to anticipate how the Rover might climb, you could calculate the gear inch range of your current bike, and for the Rover. You can then get an idea of which gear on your current bike corresponds to the lowest gear on the Rover. Check out Sheldon Brown's gear inch calculator.

    http://sheldonbrown.com/gears/

    If you need help figuring out how to use it and what the numbers mean then let me know. I've found that I need lower gears on recumbents than I do on upright bikes, so keep that in mind.

    I have a large friend that considered buying wider bars for his Rover because the brake cables were rubbing him. I was able to tie them back in a way that's no longer annoying. Turning the brake levers around so the cables exit to the outside has worked for some. However, if your body is hitting the bars then moving cables isn't going to help. Keep in mind that wider bars means that the hand grips are further apart, which may not be desirable to some riders since even the stock grips are wider than many other trikes.

    I've never ridden a trike without a rear fender, but I've heard others complain that without a fender that they are sometimes hit in the back of the head with rocks. I run a full set of fenders because I sometimes ride in wet conditions.

    A rear rack is a good option to consider. It gives you a solid place to mount a rear tail light, and a place to mount a trunk bag to hold snacks and various essentials.

    You should also consider a method of keeping your feet on the pedals. If a foot slips off and hits the ground, then you could run over your own leg and do serious damage. Shoes with cleats and matching pedals work great, but there's also heel slings and big plastic pedals with straps to hold your feet in place. Just depends on your needs. Speedplay Frog pedals would be a good choice if you want to get special biking shoes. Otherwise heel slings work with regular shoes. I would avoid SPD pedals since they have minimal and low quality float, but they work for some people.

    A safety flag should also be considered, whether from TerraTrike, or a third party if you want something more visible.

    Rob
  • robpur wrote:
    I would avoid SPD pedals since they have minimal and low quality float, but they work for some people.

    A safety flag should also be considered, whether from TerraTrike, or a third party if you want something more visible.

    Rob

    I agree with most of your post and certainly there are better pedal solutions out there but considering that the stock crankset on the Rover is complete crap I would suggest that SPD pedals, used by tens of millions worldwide, and a single crank with removable Alloy ring is a more balanced solution for the same cost or less than the Frog pedals. I have used SPD pedals for years and find them to be an excellent choice with a few drawbacks that on a trike become a non issue. Namely getting your feet out a low speeds can be a bit terrifying on two wheels but on a Trike?

    With the terrain the OP is dealing with it might also be an idea to consider buying a single speed Rover and having an SRAM DD drive wheel, rear deraiiluer, and idler built/mounted, assuming it fits in the dropouts, would not add much in the way of total cost over an 8 speed but really open up gearing options.

    I did not load my trikes up with allot of accessories since they are already quite heavy. Choosing instead to add things as I went along and found an absolute need. So a flag or better yet several LED flashing light sets facing back and to the side are a must. A mirror on the left handlebar is also an absolute if riding in any kind of traffic situations right side for me not so much. As for bags I used two 5/16" button head screws in the top of the seat to mount a Think Tank Urban disguise 40 camera bag mostly because I already owned it. Pricey but bombproof, removable, and with shoulder strap it is well insulated so it keeps food and drinks nice and cool. I also had an old Rhode Gear mountain bike handlebar bag laying around and found it worked nicely on the frame right in front of the seat for easy access and keys, phone, tube, and a few tools.

    I do ride in the rain and it is a pain when any moisture or mud you ride through ends up on the underside of your arms so maybe fenders but for the few times I was caught in the rain I chose not to pay the weight penalty.
  • I think you best bet, it to lower your gearing a bit. I would stay away from a 26" wheel, because that raises the gearing. A Nuvinci would probably be a good way to go, but is a bit pricey. Do a search on this forum on Nuvinci hubs that people have added to their Rover, and there is quite a bit of information on the hub and the gearing combinations you can get with it since you can select the sprocket you want.

    I would decide if the gearing on your Rockhopper works for the terrain that you are riding, then post the gearing here, and we can figure out what combinations of components will work to duplicate the gearing for your Rover. Staying with an Internal Gear Hub, is a nice feature for a Trike, since if you have to make a quick stop, you can downshift while you are stopped and easily start off in a suitable low gear. With a derailleur in the rear, you would have to get off the trike, lift the back wheel while spinning the pedals to downshift to a low gear, which is a real pain in the neck. Many trike riders have junked their derailleurs and switched to IGH hubs for that reason alone.
  • Have been reading older posts a lot more since having a broken wing (2 weeks ago today).

    Have read mention of the NuVinci (Continuously Variable Planetary) hub. And those that had gone with a rear derailleur mixed it with either a 3 chain-ring or a Speed Drive. While I find the reading fascinating one must have ridden a trike long enough, and has the required resources to get that hardcore.
    What I find equally satisfying is that a common Rover or Rambler can handle these technological advances. :D

    Looking at the former OEM cassette: 13T, 15T, 17T, 20T, 23T, 26T, 30T & BioPace 48T, 38T, 28T. Guess BioPace doesn't exist anymore; though I wonder, since the Rover is initially geared low, if BioPace could actually be a benefit - even as a single sprocket.
    Don't have the ability to flip the MTB over to check the crank, but going from searched information of the Shimano EXAGE 400LX: Could be a FC-M400 175mm (right) crankarm on Biopace-SG, with the common 48/38/28. It is a CroMo 18" frame, with Direct-Drive if that helps any.

    Despite the controversy of people exploiting the BioPace past its intentions, find that I never once had a TDC or bottoming-out issue ever, instead it kept me pedaling better than a round chain-ring. Not had any knee issues in the past 22 years.
    Then too I do not know the body mechanic difference between an upright as opposed to a recumbent. Had only owned a Brike in North Sacramento which was easy rolling to flat terrain. Hills and overpasses were a pain, and the beam flexed uncomfortably over when bearing down to go up over an overpass or hill.

    Mag-Wheeled Brike
    magwheelbrike_zpsd1bc6168.jpg


    My list gets changed with various topics read then researched. Unsure how one 'upgrades' various pieces, and/or if TerraTrike assembles some of these before shipment:

    • Rover, 8 Speed Nexus
    • 20 inch wheels
    • Breathable Mesh Upgrade *
    • BB7 Brakes - Do not see mention of the brakes, just the pads.
    • Power Grip Pedals - Can probably make weaved paracord heel slings.
    • Accessory & Handlebar Mounts: for use with Sigma BC-1009 computer, headlamp, CatEye Reflex LED Reflectors, TwoFish Lockblock with flashlight, cheap bell.
    • Flag - Heard spirals were better?
    • Mirror - Has a Third Eye on helmet too
    • Rack - Have a Blackburn MtnRack, but that's also for a 26" wheel so probably would not work.


    Eventually want to get:
    • Schwalbe Marathon PLUS 20 x 1.35 Tires, thorn protector strip, & Flat Attack sealant
    • Headrest
    • Trike Hangar
    • Fender set - Undecided which models
    • Panniers - Extra cargo space for removable items before going shopping.
    • Canopy

    ¬ ITL
  • The Rover 8 speed Nexus will give you a better low gear but not much of a high gear, if I remember, it was in the low 60". The range of the Nexus is not as high as the Sturmey Archer and Nuvinci, which is the highest a 3.6. I wouldn't bother with a head rest on a Rover, I doubt if you will ever use it. For the best in pedals, SPD's or some other clipless pedlas are used my most trike riders. Very few use Power grips and the people that buy Power Grips, usually replace them with clipless, pretty quickly.
  • Don't plan on going more than 25 MPH, and that's usually going across the bridge from Fruitland, ID into Ontario, OR. That bridge doesn't look too bad, but have gone faster than the top gear on the MTB.

    This year's average speed has been 8.79 MPH, with average maximum at 16.59 MPH. Was cruising around at 10 MPH but have slowed down due to the heat & wind.

    In all my years of riding have never once used shoe clips. To me it seems silly & confined. Not sure if it's due to being flat footed or having a foot disability. I like to change the angle how my feet are on the pedal, or move forward/back at will. Freedom wise the Power Grips seem like a viable option for a trike since one's feet are on the pedals a lot more. Will take some getting used not putting my feet down.


    Headrest I figured would give another vantage point for a light and/or to hang the Camelbak Lobo hydration pack from. Guess I could facilitate a hangar onto the back of the seat, or get one of them U headrests from Utah Trikes - which are more expensive.
    1.jpg


    If ever hit the high money on a lotto might see about a Power Drive / Nuvinci system, but until then have to be more realistic. May take some time to get a stock Rover with a Rack - that would be the bare minimum I think. For our area, which is mostly flat, yet has slopes and rises, an 8 speed would be far more beneficial than a 3 speed.

    Don't think there are any other affordable trikes capable of 350~400 pounds unless one is willing to fork out $5K, even then it would have to look like this for that much coin.
    BR5xs6dCQAEKBlI.jpg

    Still, for the performance, Tuk's Custom Rover looks more like the best of breed. That would be the Rover to get if money was not an option.

    ¬ ITL
  • Don't plan on going more than 25 MPH, and that's usually going across the bridge from Fruitland, ID into Ontario, OR. That bridge doesn't look too bad, but have gone faster than the top gear on the MTB.

    This year's average speed has been 8.79 MPH, with average maximum at 16.59 MPH. Was cruising around at 10 MPH but have slowed down due to the heat & wind.

    In all my years of riding have never once used shoe clips. To me it seems silly & confined. Not sure if it's due to being flat footed or having a foot disability. I like to change the angle how my feet are on the pedal, or move forward/back at will. Freedom wise the Power Grips seem like a viable option for a trike since one's feet are on the pedals a lot more. Will take some getting used not putting my feet down.


    Headrest I figured would give another vantage point for a light and/or to hang the Camelbak Lobo hydration pack from. Guess I could facilitate a hangar onto the back of the seat, or get one of them U headrests from Utah Trikes - which are more expensive.
    1.jpg


    If ever hit the high money on a lotto might see about a Power Drive / Nuvinci system, but until then have to be more realistic. May take some time to get a stock Rover with a Rack - that would be the bare minimum I think. For our area, which is mostly flat, yet has slopes and rises, an 8 speed would be far more beneficial than a 3 speed.

    Don't think there are any other affordable trikes capable of 350~400 pounds unless one is willing to fork out $5K, even then it would have to look like this for that much coin.
    BR5xs6dCQAEKBlI.jpg

    Still, for the performance, Tuk's Custom Rover looks more like the best of breed. That would be the Rover to get if money was not an option.

    I a trike, if your foot falls off a pedal which it will if not clipped in in some way, you get an injury called "leg suck", which will probably land you in the hospital and may cripple you for life. The trike runs over your leg and the faster you are going, the worse the injury. A broken leg(s) and or ankles is quite common. Many months of rehab and crutches are the usual result in that type of injury. Do a google search on "Leg Suck" injuries on Trikes, or search the topic on this forum.
  • Captainbob wrote:
    On a trike, if your foot falls off a pedal which it will if not clipped in in some way, you get an injury called "leg suck", which will probably land you in the hospital and may cripple you for life. The trike runs over your leg and the faster you are going, the worse the injury. A broken leg(s) and or ankles is quite common. Many months of rehab and crutches are the usual result in that type of injury. Do a google search on "Leg Suck" injuries on Trikes, or search the topic on this forum.

    Aye, read that in a few posts. On the Brike I never had that happen using stock pedals. Does not mean it will/could ever happen though. As I mentioned in the Power Grip pedals in the list of things to get, have noted to weave heel slings.

    Strapped Heel Support Pedals would be too confining in case one had to dismount quickly.

    Your clipped shoes suggestion has been noted with supporting evidence. One would have to carry an extra bag with shoes to lug around if wanting to go to the store, fly some boomerangs, visit friends, take in a movie, etc.
    Still would be a smaller price to pay compared to the worst scenario, but if one is gong to worry about all the what ifs why even ride a bike/trike?

    ¬ ITL
  • Captainbob wrote:
    On a trike, if your foot falls off a pedal which it will if not clipped in in some way, you get an injury called "leg suck", which will probably land you in the hospital and may cripple you for life. The trike runs over your leg and the faster you are going, the worse the injury. A broken leg(s) and or ankles is quite common. Many months of rehab and crutches are the usual result in that type of injury. Do a google search on "Leg Suck" injuries on Trikes, or search the topic on this forum.

    Aye, read that in a few posts. On the Brike I never had that happen using stock pedals. Does not mean it will/could ever happen though. As I mentioned in the Power Grip pedals in the list of things to get, have noted to weave heel slings.

    Strapped Heel Support Pedals would be too confining in case one had to dismount quickly.

    Your clipped shoes suggestion has been noted with supporting evidence. One would have to carry an extra bag with shoes to lug around if wanting to go to the store, fly some boomerangs, visit friends, take in a movie, etc.
    Still would be a smaller price to pay compared to the worst scenario, but if one is gong to worry about all the what ifs why even ride a bike/trike?

    On a trike, your leg falling off the pedal is not a question of "if", but "when". Sooner or later it will happen, unless fastened to the pedal in some way. The best way is clipless. I wear Bike Nashbar Ragster ll Sandals all the time with SPDs so I can walk, and do everything else in these sandals.
  • Hmm... am looking at two different pedals:

    • Clipless/Platform Pedals - This one appears to be the best of both worlds.
    TT600185-2T.jpg?1346935116

    • Time ATAC Alium Mountain Pedals - Then this one was seen on Twitter which does look more interesting.
    TM-AAMP-BK-ANGLE.jpg
    ¤ Large alloy pedal body gives your foot plenty of support
    ¤ ATAC system sheds mud and makes it easy to clip in and out
    ¤ Separated spring and foot retention systems let you adjust the spring tension without making it harder to clip out
    ¤ Included cleats have +/- 5° of float and+/- 3mm of lateral float to keep it easy on the knees



    Wonder if can pull the gears & derailleurs off my 1991 Specialized Rockhopper and convert a single-speed Rover with them. wrench_zps8089e6f7.gif

    ¬ ITL
  •   Am back, slightly heavier, and more determined to get a Rover. Hoverong around 380# still. Broke my shoulder a 3 summers ago and not overly comfortable on two wheel since. Am going solo now, took care of and lost both parents, and I'm tired of being heavy & miss riding a cycle.

      There's a fella that builds recumbent trikes out of scrap parts and metal, perty primitive, but he made one for himself and his wife has a hand assist on the pedals. They look like they are having fun, but I want to ride further than juts around the park.

    See now that TerraTrike has financing and I contacted them on the steps for going that route and suggested additions. No word back yet. And I'm totally not on track with what was going on two years ago on my original post. So... without much confusion,what is strongly recommended to acquire for an area around Ontario, OR (44.024165, -116.993133) to Payette, ID (44.069558, -116.936486)?

     Local bike shop might have some recommendations of front gear changes at some point, so first off I have to decide on External 8 or Internal 8.

      Will be riding around in the evenings too, and I want to track my progress on a cycle computer, Fitbit, and S4.
     • Sigma BC1009 Cycle Computer
     • Front & Rear CatEye LED Reflectors (TL-LD560 Reflex)
     • Cell phone mount of some sort for GPS coordinating.
     • Water bottle would be a good idea although I do have a CambelBak Lobo that I've not used since breaking the left shoulder on the Rockhopper.

      Am figuring will want to get these:
     • Luggage Rack
     • Safety Flag & Pole
     • Wide Handlebars
     • Mounts Headlamp / LED Reflector, & cycle computer
     • Decent Headlamp

      Unfamiliar with the internal vs. external derailleur as I've grown up using nothing but derailleurs. Was oping to find someone locally that I could test drive their Rover first though only came close to a Rambler with 3 flats. Can almost buy a base model outright but if I can break it up in payments that would be easier.

    ¬ ITL
  • If you need the gear range cheap, go with the base 8 ext Rover and put a cheap 3 chainring 28-38-48 on the front Amazon 20-30 bucks. It will fit right on and don't bother with a front derailleur. You can shift down quick and easy by simply pushing the chain tube to the left and it will shift down as quickly and smoothly as a derailleur. Shifting back up a little more deliberate but been doing it for 5000 km and it works fine.... providing you can reach towards the front of the chain tube. Try it. Details on my blog

    SPD compatible clipless pedals and shoes should be a priority

  • So you upgraded to a 24 inch drive wheel.

    How does the steering handle when first learning to ride? I remember having a Brike in my 20's but that was all lean steering ... and very low clearance. Actually miss having that one.

    Never owned or used SPD system, though I have a 3 chain ting BioPace gears on a 91 Specilized Rockhopper. Probably wouldn't match up to the Rover and the recumbent stroking. So did you get a new crank set to fit the Rover with 3 chain rings?

    Wished there was someone with a Rover in the Boise/Caldwell or even Weiser area. Just to see it ride, turn, and such. Maybe even sit on it and test drive it a short ways rather than buying one blind. All I ahve seen are videos online, none show up close how things work and all.

    ¬ ITL
  • You could do a youtube search for "Terra trike rover" to see videos to get some idea of how they ride. I have a rover nuvince that is very comfortable and handles nicely.
  • Do the Nexus on a 26" rear, but you'd lose the granny gears unless you add a 2nd sprocket up front to get them back for those hills you mentioned. @jamesr is good with gear and sprocket specifics.
  • edited September 2016
    Going to go look at a Rover in La Grand, OR tomorrow. Least if my car gets me there anyhow. :)

    So go with an IGH? Figured I'd ask to see if they have a lower geared sprocket available to put on if/when needed. Trying to cut cost at first so I can get out and ride. For the past 3 years I've put this off because I wanted the top end with the front IGH gearing and haven't gotten one yet.
    This time of year is when I am thinking about the Rover and I keep putting it off cause this time of year is rough in finances. But I'm going to go see them tomorrow, God willing, and if they are as good as everyone says they are will strap one on the top of my Suzuki sub-compact station wagon for the 2.5 hour drive home. :)

    They only have the External and Internal 8's in stock. So it will be either one of them. From what I've gathered the internal has the ability to shift without pedaling, and for the way things are here with bad drivers and hills the internal might be best for on-the-fly shifting. Just hope the internal geared hubs have reliability and longevity.

    My second biggest worry is how to lock this up in a public place if I need to go shopping or use the dunny. I have one kryptonite U lock, and a cable lock - and we all know cable locks are almost worthless. Guess there are GPS trackers and motion alert devices available nowadays.

    ¬ ITL
  • So... external for chain-rings, and internal hub for stock.

    Internal is good for shifting on the fly without having to move. And know external if one had to suddenly stop for traffic issues that would make it rough to get going again if in a higher gear.

    Do have one grade to climb, the bridge coming from Ontario, OR into Fruitland, ID, minus the few overpasses going over freeways. That's about it for here.

    Only got 4 hours sleep for the drive to La Grande. :P

    ¬ ITL
  • This Magicshine MJ-808-L2 looks like it could be goof if can find a place to mount it. The wide angle lens could really broaden the beam for rural riding, and can last 7+ hours depending upon external battery options. And is under $100 too. Mounting location could be a problem if there's no stem mounting kit option.

      I tend to get home late. When the weather warms up this would be a perfect time to go out for a ride, wouldn't be as much traffic either.

    ¬ ITL
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