All Terrain Customized Rover?

edited August 2013 in Rover
There are so many experienced folks here with massive knowledge, I wonder if you all could pool your knowledge into a near perfect customized Rover set up for all terrain (i.e. up & down hills, flats, hard-pack trails, rocky trails, urban/suburban/semi-farm roads).

And how would you set this up: Rover single-speed, then build from there? What size cranks, pedal types, type(s) of derailleurs or IGH (internally geared hubs)? Please list brake types too, and any other suggested (yet brief) items. ;)

Still stuck on longevity & cost to replace of chain/cassette verses the IGH setup. Have read stories where IGH are good between 1K to 4K miles, and bicycle wise chain & cassette every 3K miles. So the replacement cost would have to be figured in too, as one that invests in a custom trike also would want reliability & peak performance.

Not sure everyone can agree on the same setup, but using the Rover as base model since it can hold 350 to 400 pounds. None of the other models come in a steel frame to support near the same weight with a lower seat - so Rover would be a base model to work with.

Could even go so far as (a) basic setup for hill & flats, to (b) more advanced setup, to (c) suggested pro version.

Thank You :geek:

¬ ITL

Comments

  • Tadpole trikes do not make great off road trikes, go up any incline on grass gravel sand and the back wheel spins, get a delta trike with a drive system that drives both wheels, every day on the trike forums you hear of people tipping over tadpole trikes even going up a driveway they do tip easy, a delta trike is what you want for what you want to do.
  • Tuk wrote:
    Tadpole trikes do not make great off road trikes, go up any incline on grass gravel sand and the back wheel spins, get a delta trike with a drive system that drives both wheels, every day on the trike forums you hear of people tipping over tadpole trikes even going up a driveway they do tip easy, a delta trike is what you want for what you want to do.

    Sun is the only other option, and the rear derailleur looks to almost drag on the ground. Guess won't get a trike - least any time soon then. Thanks for the feedback. ;)

    ¬ ITL
  • Riding a Trike on off road is like riding a Lexus on a dune buggy route.
  • All terrain trike? http://www.harborfreight.com/all-terrain-tricycle-69694.html

    Soft sand/gravel will stop any human powered vehicle except purpose built ( I.e Mountain Bikes/Trikes) .

    My wife and I have ridden 2000+ miles on our Rover 8s and probably 3-400 miles have been on dirt or gravel roads. Another 400+ on hard packed gravel rails to trails and so far no issues with the Strumney Archer IGH. We did upgrade the tires to Schwabe Big Apples with thorn resistant tubes. These are great tires for almost all conditions.

    I rode that fantastic Hiawatha trail out there in Idaho and had no issues going uphill on the gravel.
    You need to be careful on gravel roads to avoid ruts and washouts but that is true with road bikes too.

    My first trike was a Sun EZ USX and it was useless on dirt roads and scary on some paved roads.
    I learned this the day I attempted to ride up Beale street where it ascends from the Mississippi river bank. I was pushing hard in low gear when with no warning the front wheel lifts SEVERAL FEET into the air. With the under seat steering there is no way to push the damn thing down. To make things worse , because only the right wheel is driven the bike immediately snaps sideway before it slams back down on the ground!
  • edited August 2013
    Guess you fellas have an entirely different assumption for trails. Definitely not talking single track or some obscure thing. Even the fat tire trike should be able to handle this stuff, as most non-skinny rode bikes can. If a trike cannot go down hard packed road, then it obviously cannot handle rough paved rural road surfaces.

    TerraTrike was wanting to send one of their trikes to the Antarctic, that's definitely not paved road. But I do recall seeing a fat-tire trike on stuff off road.

    So does this mean TerraTrike has more faith in the products they make? Or are you fellas stuck in the dark ages? :lol:

    We have paved roads here, some rough, some have dirt/chipped rock hard packed. Roadies ride them if they have to, but suited more for 1.65+ tires obviously. The newer roads are nice but not all streets here have bike lanes, as such one has to do 30 MPH or ride uneven sidewalks.
    Occasionally I like to ride down the Weiser River Trail which is chipped rock, other rock, and fairly hard packed. Great ride.
    There are a lot of charity events held on this trail. There's even a two-day 89 mile trek of the entire trail coming up next month that pulls in about 100 people from all over.

    With St. Lukes & St. Alphonsis hospitals vying/competing for the best image, they sponsor many road riding events. We had 6 already with a few more coming up.

    New Meadows - WRT
    1001649_534732506586240_1724571816_n.jpg

    Fire roads
    1002393_534733153252842_1526276040_n.jpg

    Maintained trail
    576760_534734173252740_2031200578_n.jpg

    Boardwalk trestles
    485602_534734249919399_1841295232_n.jpg

    Common trail
    8611_534735406585950_364252392_n.jpg

    It should be able to handle this easily?
    1001829_534736586585832_1568253636_n.jpg

    Trail between Fruitvale and Council
    419171_534737696585721_1820194251_n.jpg

    Not often, but there the surface on the right.
    396875_518028458256645_489505119_n.jpg

    Or...
    WRvrTrl.jpeg


    Trail can be a bit jittery though. This was too much for the camera on a Gorillapod and wasn't expecting GoPro quality either. Was more of humor me test video.


    Most riding is on rural, urban/suburban, city-like roads though. Still have my 22 year old (CrMo) Specialized Rockhopper too, if a trike cannot touch this.
    DSC03307-BIKER_zpsea6aabdf.jpg ;)

    ¬ ITL
  • schosser wrote:
    snickering_hyenas_zpsab2ac56e.gif /bonk
    schosser wrote:
    Soft sand/gravel will stop any human powered vehicle except purpose built ( I.e Mountain Bikes/Trikes) .

    My wife and I have ridden 2000+ miles on our Rover 8s and probably 3-400 miles have been on dirt or gravel roads. Another 400+ on hard packed gravel rails to trails and so far no issues with the Strumney Archer IGH. We did upgrade the tires to Schwabe Big Apples with thorn resistant tubes. These are great tires for almost all conditions.

    I rode that fantastic Hiawatha trail out there in Idaho and had no issues going uphill on the gravel.
    You need to be careful on gravel roads to avoid ruts and washouts but that is true with road bikes too.

    Sand & gravel stops me on anything, mostly due to gravity & weight. yield_zpsa0e2f81a.gif

    TerraTrike can handle it! Great to know that TerraTrike does have a road/trail trike-ability after all. Thank you! thumbsup_zpsf371ab0c.gif TerraTrike should put a story up about you two for spokes models.
    schosser wrote:
    My first trike was a Sun EZ USX and it was useless on dirt roads and scary on some paved roads.
    I learned this the day I attempted to ride up Beale street where it ascends from the Mississippi river bank. I was pushing hard in low gear when with no warning the front wheel lifts SEVERAL FEET into the air. With the under seat steering there is no way to push the damn thing down. To make things worse , because only the right wheel is driven the bike immediately snaps sideway before it slams back down on the ground!

    Now that would be scarey indeed! omg_zps58f75347.gif Definitely would not want to see that happen. Makes me cringe thinking about going up overpasses... !
    So only the right wheel is powered. That answered another major question. Had wondered of was single or dual.

    The only other 350#~400# trike that came up on search was a Sun EZ-3 USX HD Delta Trike. Had heard a lot about bad quality on those trikes on forums, but then too most forums are about people putting down the product or one another instead of being helpful, which is why I posted here. :)

    Am getting quite an edu-trike-cation here. :geek:

    ¬ ITL
  • Sounds like a case of geo-graphical mis-communication .
    Down south here a trail is about 3 feet across and surrounded by kudzu and poision ivy.

    The sun trike you are looking at is the newer version of mine... almost exactly the same
    Here's a couple of pictures showing a some of typical gravel bike paths .

    The Mississippi levee in Madison County Illinois (Across from St.Louis)
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/schosh/9592160715/
    I painted the seat supports orange to more visibility .

    Route of the Hiawathaset-72157628568563653http://www.flickr.com/photos/schosh/6587727229/in/set-72157628568563653
    Im having trouble linking to Flickr...stand by
  • schosser wrote:
    Sounds like a case of geo-graphical mis-communication .
    Down south here a trail is about 3 feet across and surrounded by kudzu and poision ivy.

    The sun trike you are looking at is the newer version of mine... almost exactly the same
    Here's a couple of pictures showing a some of typical gravel bike paths .

    The Mississippi levee in Madison County Illinois (Across from St.Louis)
    9592160715_a02522ded7_z.jpg
    I painted the seat supports orange to more visibility .

    Route of the Hiawatha6587727229_6c2af5c9c1_z.jpg
    Im having trouble linking to Flickr...stand by

    Bonzer photos! ;) I have a preference to orange, more as there's not enough of it in the world.

    May I inquire as to what pedals you two use? Looks like there's a flap on the right pedal of the first photo. Only asking cause of Capt'n Bob's scare tactics. /grin

    ¬ ITL
  • Actually, Because my wife has cerabal palsy we have experimented with numerous pedals over the years. THe pic in Idaho is three years old, and I was using stock pedals. The Mississippi picture was earlier this year when my wife was trying powergrip straped pedals . Both of now have shimano dual purpose SPD type clip in pedals. They work really, really well although there has been a learning cure with setting the angle and location of the clips. We both wear bike sandals which have recessed clip mounts and find we can ride better and still have reasonable walking shoes. I rode 105 miles of Ragbrai in July and the pedals/sandals/tryke were great.

    Like yourself I have a Mountain Bike but find the TT to be much more pleasant to ride for long distances. The MB is fun for quick thrills. I compare the two to my feelings about boats. Sometimes you want thrills so you ride a jet ski or some other powered vessel. Other times a sailboat is much more satisfying, drinking a beer , enjoy the day ect.
  • Still no trikes around here save one fellow who scrapped some bike parts, used metal, and did a scrappy-looking design that works for him. His wife he out two assist bars up top to use with the hand to pull back and forth with. They don't do any serious speeds on them and look like they are having fun.

    I want to ride, but after breaking my left shoulder on a dirt trail have got the jitters. i been out, and tore up a front derailleur cause of loose gravel combined with impatient drivers. But there are a few new housing developments in the area that have bicycle lanes - just have to cross the highway to get to them ... which is the scary part. Riding a bicycle to the median lane isn't bad, it's waiting there with all those metal laden vehicles buzzing past that makes one feel rather inferior. :Q

    ¬ ITL
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