Oh deer,.....

I was coming around a corner on the path,along the shoreline, in the city, coming out of the reeds and brush, materializes the head, chest and front legs of a whitetail. I got within 10' of it. It was looking the other way, but bolted back towards the water, within a couple of seconds.
I was thinking, " You're not suppose
to be here!" , but the crashing sounds
it made made me believe it was real.
It appeared like a phantom. I wasn't
expecting THAT! On the return trip I went by slowly and saw the narrow
path the was dirt, leading to the water.
Path was used a lot. Railroad tracks
closeby may be its' avenue for travel.
Anyone care to share their close en-
counter?

Comments

  • Hit a deer on the Rockhopper back in the early 90's. Cateye 2 C cell light was worthless. Tore out a toe clip. That was on the American River Biketrail near Folsom, CA.

    Bought a NightSun light: 10 watt low beam, 30 watt high beam, rechargeable for $250. Best light ever! Never burned out the bulb in 10+ years of ownership either. Problem solved. :D

    ¬ ITL
  • Is that another bike? Upright?
  • I want to go sit on those tracks in a lawn chair and aim the lens towards the opening in the reeds. Bug dope will be needed. If I had put a video cam on the nose of the Rover, it may have captured the deer cause of the wide angle lens.
  • If you ride in November, bring your hunting rifle!
  • Camera on the boom won't work well, too much up and down movement.

    ¬ ITL
  • I once came around the corner on a trail to find a mother skunk and babies in the middle of the path looking at me.

    Thank god for disk brakes!
    image
    Jeff "Chonk" Yonker
    Marketing Dude @TerraTrike

    You miss 100% of the shots you don't take - Wayne Gretsky
  • chonk wrote: »
    I once came around the corner on a trail to find a mother skunk and babies in the middle of the path looking at me.

    Thank god for disk brakes!

    Oh gawd! Who won? lol

    ¬ ITL
  • Oh gawd! Who won? lol

    I was able to stop quickly and back away. another 20 feet though and it would've been a very bad day.
    THIS however is my biggest fear when riding: https://youtu.be/K4eckQGYLmg
    image
    Jeff "Chonk" Yonker
    Marketing Dude @TerraTrike

    You miss 100% of the shots you don't take - Wayne Gretsky
  • Really, @Chonk? You worry about that in Grand Rapids, MI?
  • Well not so much here - but I get around.
    Mostly in the south - Rattlers - I've heard horror stories.
    image
    Jeff "Chonk" Yonker
    Marketing Dude @TerraTrike

    You miss 100% of the shots you don't take - Wayne Gretsky
  • Seen snakes warming themselves on the path a few years back. Warned walkers heading that way who were walking their dog. Smallish snake, type
    unknown. Timber rattlers in Mich.
    Prob a rare event here for bikers.
  • Not sure what snake "Timber rattlers" actually refers to, but Michigan has only one rattlesnake species: Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnake.

    "Michigan DNR - Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnake (Sistrurus catenatus catenatus)
    www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,4570,7-153-10370_12145_12201-32995--,00.html
    The few bites that occur to humans often result from attempts to handle or kill the snakes. Any bite from a massasauga should receive prompt professional medical attention. When compared to other rattlesnakes found in the United States, the massasauga is the smallest and has the least toxic venom."
  • The best rattlesnake is a dead rattlesnake with its head buried 3 feet under dirt.

    ¬ ITL
  • Rattlers in Idaho?
  • Pretty much every time we ride here in Rural Tennessee, we encounter Deer, Turkeys, Raccoons, Snakes, etc., and in Cades Cove, the occasional Black Bear. We have to be on the ready at all times...!!!!!!... B)
  • Sort-of on the subject of potential animal interactions with our trikes... watch out for horses - especially if you have any brightly colored flapping flags!

    Was on the descent portion of the Banks-Vernonia "rails to trails" ride in Oregon (13 miles downhill!), when I came around a corner and found two horses on the 'horse' trail that parallel the bike path. So happened that at that point in the trail, there was an embankment on the up-hill side of the horse trail.

    The first horse tried to ride up the embankment to the startlement of the rider just as I passed him... slammed on the brakes to slow down so the second rider didn't have the same issue.

    I've also seen horses that are close to the road/trail take great exception to the flapping flags as I've ridden on the road....

  • edited June 2017
    Banks has a trail?? Longer drive, but this intrigues me. Edit: Nevermind, it's on the other side of Portland. Guess was thinking of Baker, my bad.
    Wished there was a book for cyclists for cycle-friendly roads & trails in Idaho & Oregon.

    Yeah, horses and road apples... every time I see a road apple @Jrobiso2 comes to mind. LOL

    Finn, rattlesnakes are everywhere me thinks. Timber rattlers are the worst since they blend in so well to the ground. Idaho/Oregon has rattlesnakes everywhere it seems. Anderson Ranch Dam is snattlerake hell.
    Luckily I've only seen good snakes, a few had pokes their heads out of rock crags just to startle ya! Nice thing about the warmer months, wetness evaporates quickly.

    ¬ ITL
  • IdahoTW, check out https://www.traillink.com/ Loads of trails in Idaho!
  • I thought it was traillink.org, not com?
  • Any of you come across a Eastern Hognose snake and all the theatrics they perform ? We had a couple in our yard last summer and once you figure out what they are doing it's sorta fun watching them.
  • Yep, I've had Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnakes, Eastern Hognose Snakes, Fox Snakes, Milk Snakes, and Eastern Garter Snakes all in the "Michigan Basement" of the house I lived in at the Audubon sanctuary I managed for 18 years in Michigan (near the intersection of I-94 & I-69). Apparently it was a hibernaculum!?!

    Many snake species have state or federal protection. And with everyone seemingly carrying cell phones with cameras everywhere these days, I'd think twice before committing a felony and killing a possible protected species. Michigan's Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnake is now federally listed as a Threatened Species. First offence for killing one carries a $3,500 fine. Simply possessing a body part of one is a $500-$2,000 fine. And Harassing one carries a $1000 fine!

    While this species will try to avoid confrontation, they will bite if in danger and they are venomous. This is the only venomous snake species in the state of Michigan, and the Upper Peninsula is void of Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnakes. It's the smallest and least venomous rattlesnake in the US BTW.

    If you are ever bitten by one, DO NOT run or ride to the hospital as fast as possible. Instead, as calmly as possible, get yourself to an emergency room.

    I've only heard of one fatality from a Massasauga- an eleven year old boy was hitting one with a stick when it bit him. He ran home (reportedly 2 miles) as fast as he could. By the time his parents reached the hospital with him, there was little they could do for him as his running had pumped the venom to every part of his body. They say he could have survived if he would have simply walked home before going to the hospital.
  • edited June 2017
    Luckily for us snakes don't carry cell phones. :) Don't think there is a shortage of rattlesnakes in Idaho or Oregon.

    Now some people I've met will deliberately so kill a rattlesnake, I tend to leave them be and try to convince them to wonder off on their own. It's when snakes get stupid that the pistol comes out to end its terrorism.

    But there are people that eat the things, adorn the rattles to hats and necklaces, and use the snake hides as belt or hatbands. Snakes are best left alone, and like other nature's critters, are best treated with respect and patience. But if it comes down to me or it, the snake gets it.

    ¬ ITL
  • Yep, I've had Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnakes, Eastern Hognose Snakes, Fox Snakes, Milk Snakes, and Eastern Garter Snakes all in the "Michigan Basement" of the house I lived in at the Audubon sanctuary I managed for 18 years in Michigan (near the intersection of I-94 & I-69). Apparently it was a hibernaculum!?!

    Many snake species have state or federal protection. And with everyone seemingly carrying cell phones with cameras everywhere these days, I'd think twice before committing a felony and killing a possible protected species. Michigan's Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnake is now federally listed as a Threatened Species. First offence for killing one carries a $3,500 fine. Simply possessing a body part of one is a $500-$2,000 fine. And Harassing one carries a $1000 fine!

    While this species will try to avoid confrontation, they will bite if in danger and they are venomous. This is the only venomous snake species in the state of Michigan, and the Upper Peninsula is void of Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnakes. It's the smallest and least venomous rattlesnake in the US BTW.

    If you are ever bitten by one, DO NOT run or ride to the hospital as fast as possible. Instead, as calmly as possible, get yourself to an emergency room.

    I've only heard of one fatality from a Massasauga- an eleven year old boy was hitting one with a stick when it bit him. He ran home (reportedly 2 miles) as fast as he could. By the time his parents reached the hospital with him, there was little they could do for him as his running had pumped the venom to every part of his body. They say he could have survived if he would have simply walked home before going to the hospital.

    Lady was bit by a Massasauga in the gardens at U of M Ann Arbor last or previous summer. Warning signs addressed their being in the gardens and to not go into certain areas.
  • I trust she survived?!

    Massasauga Rattlesnakes like to winter in crayfish burrows. There is supposedly a technique one can use to lure them out, but it never worked for me. Every year as Baker Sanctuary Manager (18 yr.) I searched for Massasauga's at the Sanctuary, but I only ever found them on three occasions. Well, two occasions, they found me the first year. That's how we discovered our Michigan basement was being used as a hibernacula. They avoid humans whenever possible.
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