Rover 8 speed contenplating purchasing one.

Can I get the same workout on the rover as my 2 wheeled trek 7.1 bike? I have wrist numbness issues after riding on my trek bike causing me to think the trike is a much better position ergonomically for me than the bike. I want to be able to keep up the level of workout. I'm also 6' 4" will the rover extend long enough for someone my size. I also weigh 290. Currently riding 8 - 12 miles on level concrete trails. A side trail approximately 2 - 3 miles is a large hill trail that I would like to continue to ride for the workout. Any recommendations?

Comments

  • No trike, IMO, can compare to an upright. Two entirely different riding positions, and bikes go faster than Rovers. Rambler EVO might compare since it is pedal assisted with maximum speed of 25 MPH.

    Rover is adjustable to various sizes, with a weight capacity of 400#. You'll probably get a workout on the Rover that you've not experienced on an upright, but don't plan on going much faster than 12 MPH on level ground without a tailwind.
    Headwind wise, with seat laid back more, you would find how surprising the differences in an upright compared to a recumbent trike. - My 2¢

    @JamesR will probably chime in later.

    ¬ ITL
  • Thank you! That's a little bit too pricey for me. I might be able to do the other ramblers though. Which would you recommend?
  • I don't know a thing about Ramblers, sorry. Call up Tyler @ 800-945-9910 - He would be more of an expert. Thing about TerraTrike is they don't try to sell you the top of the line model, they talk to you like real one-on-one real people talk.

    ¬ ITL
  • You asked if the Rover can be made to fit someone 6"4". I'm 6"3" and my Rover fits me fine. The boom is extended all the way out, and the seat is a bit further back than others might have theirs... but if I can fit it, you can fit it.

    Trikes are going to be a bit slower than bikes for a number of reasons. First one is you have a third wheel and the additional contact this has on the road surface. It's going to produce a bit more "drag" than a bike would have.

    Then there's the front cross section. Trikes have a larger front cross section than a bike has, due to the third wheel again. So you have more drag due to it. (This drag doesn't really start to be an issue until you hit about 10 miles an hour. Then it plays an even bigger part of the picture.)

    Next up is the added weight. That third wheel and the extra hardware for it adds weight. And this works out to slower speeds, overall.

    Then there is the fact that you are using the same muscles, but you are using them differently. It takes time to get those muscles used to the "new" way you are going to be using them. Getting the "engine" into shape is the best way to increase the speeds you are able to go. (Short of adding a motor, that is.)

    Depending on the hill of your side path, you may find that the gearing is too high on a trike. Remember you can't "stand on the pedals" with a trike like you can on a bike, so you might find that you can't get over the top like you did on an upright.

    There are options to lower the gearing. There are literally dozens of posts on this forum of how to do this. Changing the rear sprocket (on an IGH) or getting a double/triple crank or going with a Schlumpf MD or HSD.

    The biggest change you are going to see on a trike is that your head is up and you are looking around. On an upright, you are looking at the front wheel or slightly ahead of you. This all changes on a trike. You can actually see the hot air balloons, the birds, the odd deer or mountain lion, etc. Things you might miss when you're on an upright.

    I second calling TT. Tyler is sharp and knows his stuff. (The whole TT staff is pretty good.) He'll listen to your needs, and put you into a model that fits those needs. (And tell you the closest dealer for you to test ride.)
  • edited August 2017
    I can't comment on the rover 8s but on my n360 when I spin out I get to about 20mph on flat ground without a tailwind. I weight around 230# and should upgrade my gearing so I can go faster. The n360s came configured for 20-72 gear inches according to the 2015 catalog while the 2016 catalog lists the x8 at 24-66 and the i8 at 25-80 but the site lists the i8 at 20-62 and the x8 at 24-66.
  • agree with honorable lizard on bikes. repetitive stress machines, though, and many longtime 2-wheel riders find great relief from aching wrists, neck, back, crotch and knees switching to 3 wheels.

    trek 7.1 spec looks like you have have a range of about 22-92 gear-inches.
    least cost similar terratrike would be an x8 with a $300 patterson crankset added for 19-82 gear inches. ~$1400. maybe 12 pounds heavier than the trek, probably as good a flatland workout but without the pain.

    about 17 mph on the trek at 60 rpm, 15 mph with the rover. an x24 rambler [$1900] has a range of 19-90 gear-inches.
  • Thank you all! This has helped me a lot! Going to the store they have both the rambler and the rover I will test both of them out and see which one fits my needs best!
  • Rambler would probably be your best bet in the long run if and when you want to upgrade. Rover is rather limited, and probably more costly to upgrade. Rambler is lighter in weight as well.

    But yeah, you'll find yourself looking UP at the world. A trike is like a lounge chair on wheels. Be prepared for people to ask you a lot of questions cause recumbent trikes get a lot of attention.

    Found that I want to ride more than when I rode a Rockhopper. It is waay more comfortable. If you're going up a hill, and you get tired, stop - put the brakes on. Relax, have some water. Take in the scenery. Go when you're ready.

    Would highly recommend getting an SPD system, pr SPD-SL. At the very least get the heal slings (think new models come with them) so you don't fall prey to 'leg suck.'
    Trikes have a crossbar in front for both wheels. SPD-like system keeps your feet firmly planted on the pedals. Hit a dip or bump your feet are still on the pedals, not under the crossbar. And we don't fall over when stopped. :D

    ¬ ITL
  • The high gear on the Rover 8 now that they are not using the Sturmey Archer hub, is only 64". If you are going down a grade at 18+ MPH, you will most likely spin out. I have a Rover with the SA hub and love it, but you can't get that anymore. If you can afford it, you may want to look at the Rambler. The 24 speed has a wider gear range than the Nuvinci, although I do like internal hubs on a trike.
  • I go 8 miles per ride on my Rover but it takes over an hour. Don't expect the speeds but enjoy the view. Trikes are awesome!
  • I rode this morning for a little over 10 total miles through a State Park that is teeming with birds and other wildlife. At 8 miles an hour. Or less.

    Even the deer that I came upon along the edge of the road were not afraid of me at that speed.

    They looked, and no doubt thought, "Nice Trike, you old fart", and they went about their business eating the foliage at the shoulder of the road.

    I could see them, a multitude of birds, alligators and other critters, who were.....like me......just enjoying the day. (SW Florida)

    Riding fast doesn't allow you to see such things.

    I'm old(der) now, and the days go by so quickly........except when I'm riding my Trike.

    Life slowed down this morning and I'm glad.
  • I finished a ride on my Rover last week and a elderly couple on two DFs that looked like they were very frequent riders. rolled up and the lady came over and asked how I liked my Trike. I told her that I started riding bents about 15 years ago, because I was having really bad issues with my neck from riding a DF for hundreds of thousands of miles, and my arms were starting to go numb. Doctor said it was from compression in my cervical area from riding an upright bike, and holding my head up to look ahead. She replied, " Oh I never have that problem, when I ride, I just look down at the pavement in front of me" . ;)
  • edited August 2017
    After riding off and on a few months am averaging 9 to 10 MPH. Have been in 8th and holding it until I go up a slow grade, then it's back down to 7th. My Rover has the SA internal 8. It spins out around 14 to 15 MPH going downhill, so I wait until the speed comes back into range before I resume in 8th.

    Shifting at a standstill really spoils a person. ;) ax4ts06ganqq.jpg

    ¬ ITL
  • After riding off and on a few months am averaging 9 to 10 MPH. Have been in 8th and holding it until I go up a slow grade, then it's back down to 7th. My Rover has the SA internal 8. It spins out around 14 to 15 MPH going downhill, so I wait until the speed comes back into range before I resume in 8th.

    Shifting at a standstill really spoils a person. ;) ax4ts06ganqq.jpg

    Are you sure you have the SA hub, because on a downhill with my SA I don't spin out until well over 20 MPH.
  • Yes, I am quite sure.1pn62zowsoj2.jpg

    ¬ ITL
  • edited August 2017
    Yes, I am quite sure.1pn62zowsoj2.jpg

    I did the math on the speeds for the SA8 versus cadence about 7 years ago, and it should be on the TT forum somewhere, but if I remember correctlly, at around 22 mph your cadence in 8th gear should be about 75 rpm, which is definetly not spinning out. I just got back from a ride this morning, and in 7th gear I was going 16 mph at about 65 rpm.


    Just found it, here it is. http://www.terratrike.com/ttforum/discussion/448/my-evaluation-of-the-8-speed-hub
  • Well I bought the Rover and absolutely love it. Got it Friday and been putting 11 - 12 miles on it each day. Getting the feel of it turning on uneven ground at a good speed too. One wheel comes up off the ground. I'll get it all figured out the more I ride it. So far the gearing is just fine with me not sure going any faster in top gear would be that safe. Comfortable with the gearing and still getting a good workout! Went out on the trail after last nights rains and encountered mud puddles. My arms were coated with mud. Might have to invest in fenders. Thanks everyone for your input!
  • weldin4 wrote: »
    Well I bought the Rover and absolutely love it. Got it Friday and been putting 11 - 12 miles on it each day. Getting the feel of it turning on uneven ground at a good speed too. One wheel comes up off the ground. I'll get it all figured out the more I ride it. So far the gearing is just fine with me not sure going any faster in top gear would be that safe. Comfortable with the gearing and still getting a good workout! Went out on the trail after last nights rains and encountered mud puddles. My arms were coated with mud. Might have to invest in fenders. Thanks everyone for your input!

    Which gearing to you get?
  • I8 base model rover. After putting 50 miles on it already it suits me just fine. I am happy with my purchase. I find the speed is not that important at this point, as long as I am riding and getting the exercise that's all that matters. Hopefully I will convince the wife she needs one too. Each day I look forward to riding on the rover instead of dreading it on the Trek 7.1, and experiencing the pain. Looks like the son and daughter in law will get a Trek 7.1 for Christmas this year.
Sign In or Register to comment.