My two cents worth

Bought a new Rover i8 IGH with 26" rear wheel yesterday from Sun Cyclery in Phoenix,Az. Fantastic service. They spent a lot of time fitting it to me. When I told Josh what I wanted we walked a few steps and there was my baby all tricked out! First one I had ever seen in the flesh. He told me how to get on it and after a few adjustments, I rode around in the parking lot. Absolutely fantastic.
I am 76, lower back surgery, both rotator cuffs repaired, one a 100% tear and left knee scoped twice, right knee once.

Rode it on maiden trip this morning:3.36 miles, average speed 6.3, 32 minutes, max speed 12.3, according to my wireless Cateye Patrone computer. I could have gone longer but didn't want to wear out my welcome on the first day. Wanted to go this afternoon, but too hot and not a good plan.
Ride: very acceptable. Steering: instant without being overly sensitive. Braking: excellent. Double rear view mirrors:great. Gear shifting: near automatic without even thinking about it. When a different gear was need just shifted. No big grades or dips on our residential roads.

I am ecstatic with my new trike. Probably would like a Rambler even more if I could afford one. Any Cat was out if the question.

If you are looking for a trike anywhere near Phoenix, Sun Cyclery is the place to go. They were very highly recommended to me and Sun met all my needs very well.

Comments

  • Great trike and equally great dealer. Welcome to the "family" ;)
    image
    Jeff "Chonk" Yonker
    Marketing Dude @TerraTrike

    You miss 100% of the shots you don't take - Wayne Gretsky
  • Must be nice to have an IGH that you don't have to pause to shift. Older (pre-2017) Rovers have SA hubs, pause w/ no load between shifting.)

    Grats on the Rover! It's a beast!!

    ¬ ITL
  • Actually, a pre-2017 TerraTrike with an Internally geared 8-speed hub could have SA (Sturmey Archer), Nexus (Shimano Nexus), or Sram (Sram G8) depending on industry price and availability. It isn't as easy as a specific year in most cases.
  • Mine is a 2013 and it came with the Nexus-8. I am SO glad it wasn't either of the other two.
  • Elrique64 wrote: »
    Mine is a 2013 and it came with the Nexus-8. I am SO glad it wasn't either of the other two.

    heading for 15,000 miles on my 2010 Rover with the Sturmey Archer 8 speed. Not one bit of trouble with that hub.
  • I haven't heard much about the Sram G8 IGH until recently. Today I learned that the Sram G8, like the Nexus 8, can be shifted under normal load. I guess only the SA can't be shifted under any load.

    And congratulations to you Captainbob, on 15,000 miles on a 2010 Rover! I was feeling really proud of racking up 1,000 miles this summer. Here you have more than doubled that amount of miles each year for seven years- wow! How many hours a day do you ride?
  • edited September 2017
    I haven't heard much about the Sram G8 IGH until recently. Today I learned that the Sram G8, like the Nexus 8, can be shifted under normal load. I guess only the SA can't be shifted under any load.

    And congratulations to you Captainbob, on 15,000 miles on a 2010 Rover! I was feeling really proud of racking up 1,000 miles this summer. Here you have more than doubled that amount of miles each year for seven years- wow! How many hours a day do you ride?

    Usually around 4 days a week. The SA hub is sort of like a stick shift in a car, and since I grew up using a SA -3 hub as a teanager back in the early 50's, getting used to shifting then pedaling, was a snap. I think that is what caused many problems that people had with the SA8, shifting under load. Kind of like shifting a car, without stepping on the clutch first. You will most likely get much more life out of your Nexus hub if you don't shift under a heavy load either. The thing that is hardest on a internal hub is disengaging and re-engaging a gear.

    A post by Dan Burkhard who is an expert on internal hubs says this

    "Shifting under load is not advisable, even when the hub seems to respond to this action without complaining.
    The Nexus hubs have rising pawls on the axle which engage the sun gears. Shifting when torque is applied creates friction between these parts as they engage and dis engage.
    Breaking torque to shift will greatly improve the longevity of these parts."

    "
  • I had a 57 ford that had the clutch go out and I was too poor then to buy a replacement for about a week. Always being a resourceful individual, I quickly learned how to start the car in 1st gear, accelerate and listen carefully, and to shift into the next gear without the benefit of a clutch and without grinding the gears. With a little practice I could wait until the transmission and the engine were turning at roughly same speed and just slip the cogs together.

    I wonder if something similar could be done on our trikes?
  • edited September 2017
    I had a 57 ford that had the clutch go out and I was too poor then to buy a replacement for about a week. Always being a resourceful individual, I quickly learned how to start the car in 1st gear, accelerate and listen carefully, and to shift into the next gear without the benefit of a clutch and without grinding the gears. With a little practice I could wait until the transmission and the engine were turning at roughly same speed and just slip the cogs together.

    I wonder if something similar could be done on our trikes?

    Yup, I learned how to shift like that when I was a teenager. I wouldn't expect the transmission to last very long, shifting with that method, because it is hell on the synchros.. The IGH hubs are basically a manual transmission with no clutch or synchros, no matter which one you get, with the exception of the Nuvinci and Rohloff. Going from one gear to another while under power will break it sooner or later.
  • One of the quickest ways to tear up a hub or cassette is shifting under power. Either foot power for pedals or motor power for those that have put together an etrike.

    For those who are thinking about motorizing your trike, there are sensors that can detect the shift cable moving. This sends an interrupt to the motor dropping it's power off completely for about a second.

    There are versions for IGH's and external gearing options. It interrupts the motor's power for a second as the shift happens, giving you a bit of time for the shift to complete before power comes back.

    If you buy a Bafang from Lunacycles it already has the 3rd brake line (if the description says it's there.) so you won't need to buy a "Y" cable for the brake inputs. If you didn't buy from them, you will need a "Y". For other motor systems, you need to research a bit to see what cable connectors you have for the brakes and get the appropriate adapter for that connector.

    I got one of these sensors for my Nexus-8 after I had been riding for a long while. I had developed the habit of pausing my pedaling when I shift, and I find I'm still doing this at times. (It became second nature, so I have to think about not doing it now.)

    The IGH sensor is so sensitive that a 1/4 turn of the adjustor barrel shuts the motor down for the second. In fact it can shut the motor down just by bumping the cable housing with your leg, if you aren't careful. (I have a 90 degree aluminum cable noodle to route the shift cable down right out of the shifter, to eliminate this.)

    I think it was well worth the expense and redoing the cable and housing to make it all work. Shifting is a lot less painful now than it was before I put it together.
  • To clarify, when shifting I always hesitate, but not even for a second. I was told I have the nexus hub on my 2017 Rover. Today was my fifth day to ride. 3.1 miles in 28". Taking it easy and will gradually increase since I am 76 and don't want to wear out my welcome.

  • My wife has the NuVinci hub on her 2016 Rover. Very quiet. Does TT flip back n forth with the equipment?
  • FINN58 wrote: »
    My wife has the NuVinci hub on her 2016 Rover. Very quiet. Does TT flip back n forth with the equipment?

    Yes, based on a few criteria from what I've seen. the first is who is making the parts needed RIGHT NOW. The next is what is causing warranty work for TT. The last is based on what people are wanting to put on their trikes.

    If you want the stepless shifting the NuVinci is the way to go. For those who don't need/want it, I can easily recommend the Nexus-8. It handles anything I've done to it, so far, including motorizing the trike. (I did get the sensor I mentioned above to reduce the chance of tearing it up, though.)
  • I don't understand the term "stepless shifting." Can you define it?

    My Nexus 8 has been great. I just have to do adjustments for cable stretch occasionally. But, that will be require with any hub.
  • The NuVinci hub is a planetary system like the others. But what makes it smooth and quiet are the parts. Hard plastic? balls inside rotate around the center but I think the whole mechanism tips left fo right as one shifts it. Saw a bit on YouTube. I went to their site also. Someone correct me if I am wrong.
    Which is a lot.
  • edited September 2017
    "Stepless" shifting like the Nuvinci line uses is just a design with no fixed points in the "gear" range. As FINN58 said they use balls instead of gears.
    Here's a video explaining it from Fallbrook. https://youtube.com/watch?v=kN8CCY1vFC8
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