Summer is Over

edited September 22 in Rover
Ah Autumn! Triking weather! Time to do that PM before heading south.
www.bentonabudget.blogspot.com



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  • Are you coming to the Sunshine State? It's still very warm here and will be for a few months. Let me know if you want to meet for a ride. I can put the trike on the Alpaca Carrier and head on over.
  • Yep. Red Neck Riviera, midNov. Let you know
  • 92 in west Michigan now. No fall here. Only 45% humidity though. Don't know how that can be with a south wind from da Gulf.
  • It will be 40 degrees cooler in a day or two. Got to love those fronts. We've been close to 90 again. Bring back the cooler weather!
  • 56 her in Tucson at 0635 with a predicted high of 89. Finally the temps here are beginning to moderate a bit with the rest of the week no higher than the low 90s. Hallelujah, now I can ride longer without getting scorched. And, I can get up a bit later too. :)
  • How large of an umbrella do you think you can peddle with before you lift off?
  • Funny, we were in snow in Yellowstone last week and now it's 90+ in northern Michigan.
  • Still a few kph short of liftoff finn88. May try if. I get into some of that Finland aquavit
  • The cacti can't grow enough to give any amount of shade. Can't imagine riding in your enviroment. There are no woods out there except in the mountains, correct?
  • There's nothing but scrub brush out there. And, everything is BROWN, even most homes. Not my favorite place!
  • Cousin is in Phoenix. She spends summers here. I have never visited there. Guess I don't need to.
  • Phoenix is a lot different than Tucson. Crazy people have moved to Phoenix and tried to grow grass. It used to be a great place to escape allergies but not so much anymore. Most yards in Tucson are rock.

    I bet your cousin marvels at how green it is in Michigan. And, she probably likes the temps too!
  • She uses sod out there. Replaces it a section at a time.
  • Grass is the scourge of the earth! No mono-cultures for me, thanks! And it doesn't matter what state we're talking about! Seven years ago we moved back to East Lansing, Michigan, and ripped out all of our non-native species in our yard, and now have close to 150 native Michigan species of trees, shrubs, grasses, and wildflowers in our double-lot suburban yard.

    We're in Pennsylvania currently and it's 92 here as well. Only the calendar believes summer is over. :p
  • There's nothing but scrub brush out there. And, everything is BROWN, even most homes. Not my favorite place!

    Florida_bound, you've pushed my buttons and I'm about to :) . Ouch! I don't take what you say personally, but it does tell me one thing. People tend to either love the Sonoran Desert (SD) or dislike it. It's not a typical desert as most people think of the word desert. I think you were here in May, if I recall, to visit kin. We had not entered the monsoon (rainy season) season yet when the desert becomes
    verdant. Rain storms are sudden and fierce with flash flooding and spectacular lightning. (Google lightning photos in Tucson. It's popular postcard stuff.) It's the essence of Creosote in the moist air that creates the odor of the desert that I have always remembered since childhood.

    We set a record with rainfall in July and my beautiful yard which is gravel suddenly became a forest of weeds. :o The rest of year the yard is lovely gravel. (Mowing my yard once every 10 days in NW Arkansas while soaked with sweat from the crushing humidity was not my favorite thing to do and don't even get me started on raking the leaves.) Imagine paying a landscaper for a few hours work once per year. Next, picture going to the Mall in short sleeves on Christmas Day and afterward driving 30 miles up a picturesque, winding road to Mt. Lemmon at 9,100 feet where you can throw snowballs. It's possible here.

    With the rain what did grow on my lot was Texas Ranger, Bird of Paradise and Oleander shrubs with brilliant white, purple and crimson blossoms. Prickly pear cacti were covered with apples ready for picking and making jelly. The red and yellow blossoms of the Barrel cactus were in abundance. The shrubs/trees of the desert sprouted their leaves and became very green. All plant life in the SD are adapted to a scarcity of moisture in a seasonal cycle which is distinctive of the SD. And, as I said previously, people either love it or dislike it. It's personal choice, but I suspect that many have never been here for a complete year. I grew up here and there is Saguaro juice in my veins. I'll be here until I'm plant food for those majestic giants. I freely admit that I'm prejudiced. Love the area where you live as I love the SD.

    FINN58, you were partly correct about one thing. Yes, we have trees here. Vegetation and climate are more a function of altitude. If you go up into the Catalina Mountains (Mt. Lemmon for instance) there are majestic coniferous trees and no cactus. Here those mountainous areas are referred to as "Islands in the Sky". Here in the valley we have lots of cacti, boy do we have cacti, as well as shrubs/trees: Palo Verde, Mesquite, Palms, Citrus (orange, lemon, tangerine, lime, grapefruit), as well as others, but only the first two are native to the area. There is no lack of greenery even in the driest parts of the year. And rainfall is not limited to the monsoon season. There is some rainfall and occasionally a bit of snow in the winter. I vividly remember a snow here in Tucson when I was a lad of ten. I remember it because a group of hikers on Mt. Lemmon were caught in the storm and froze to death. The desert can surprise you.

    I've vented and now feel much better. :# (I think that this emoticon is a toothy grin.) And now that I've come home to Tucson, gotten settled in, communed with the giant Saguaro (very carefully), it is now time to resume my blog. I need to document some of the local trails as well as the local area and its many sights. I now have a GoPro and I'm learning a bit about video so I can make the posts a bit more interesting.

    If you have read this entire post I'll bet you are an avid reader, have a substantial library, a library card and/or Kindle Reader. ;)

  • Yeah, I read it all and you still didn't convince me. I did miss the rainy season. There was a torrential downpour before I got there. The ground was still wet. I had never seen rain there and I visited three times in different parts of the year.

    I grew up camping in the forest until my parents built a lake house. I love the green grass, multi-colored flowers, and white sand we have here. Everyone should see it once in their lifetime!
  • One year my cousin had snow before
    west Michigan did.
  • FINN58, I touched on part of your thoughts in my last post to Florida_bound, but let me continue. ;)

    In years past, people who moved to Tucson from elsewhere, tried to have lawns just like they had back home (Detroit, etc). Water is precious here and things have changed over the years. Bermuda grass lawns made one itchy, Seedless Mulberry trees made people sneeze and so on. It's common to see yards of gravel (different kinds, different colors). My yard, in a 55+ mobile home park, is ordinary pea gravel which I love not having to mow. Some more ornate yards have islands with trees, shrubs or cacti with buried irrigation systems that feed water in small amounts. Ah, life in Tucson.

    Phoenix compared to Tucson is another story. I think of it a bit like Dallas compared to Ft. Worth (I lived in Arlington for five years.) Dallas considers itself metropolitan whereas Ft. Worth is a cow town. Phoenix considers itself urban and Tucson as a quaint hacienda (Tucson is described as The Old Pueblo). I am painting things with a broad brush here you realize. BTW, Tucson never had Arpaio! Phoenix, like DFW, is a megalopolis. Tucson, at around one million, is not like the Phoenix area which is at four million plus.

  • Where are the golf courses procuring their water from out there?? The Colorado is pretty tapped out, correct?
  • FINN58 (forgot to click on Quote: Where are the golf courses procuring their water from out there?? The Colorado is pretty tapped out, correct?)

    Golf courses have turned to using recycled (gray water) for irrigation. Even along the Rillito River Trails I see they are doing recycled water drip systems. People are beginning to realize water concerns here in Arizona. Even home gardeners are beginning to catch the rainwater and use it for irrigation in some very creative ways. I'm amazed and thankful. Thanks for asking. :)
  • edited September 25
    FINN58, I touched on part of your thoughts in my last post to Florida_bound, but let me continue. ;)

    In years past, people who moved to Tucson from elsewhere, tried to have lawns just like they had back home (Detroit, etc). Water is precious here and things have changed over the years. Bermuda grass lawns made one itchy, Seedless Mulberry trees made people sneeze and so on. It's common to see yards of gravel (different kinds, different colors). My yard, in a 55+ mobile home park, is ordinary pea gravel which I love not having to mow. Some more ornate yards have islands with trees, shrubs or cacti with buried irrigation systems that feed water in small amounts. Ah, life in Tucson.

    Phoenix compared to Tucson is another story. I think of it a bit like Dallas compared to Ft. Worth (I lived in Arlington for five years.) Dallas considers itself metropolitan whereas Ft. Worth is a cow town. Phoenix considers itself urban and Tucson as a quaint hacienda (Tucson is described as The Old Pueblo). I am painting things with a broad brush here you realize. BTW, Tucson never had Arpaio! Phoenix, like DFW, is a megalopolis. Tucson, at around one million, is not like the Phoenix area which is at four million plus.

    You described it exactly as I saw it! My son had to spray the rocks to kill the weeds growing in composted leaves from the one tree in the yard. The compost in the Florida panhandle helps the grass to grow and get green.
  • edited September 26
    Everyone has their ideal place to live and usually the persons activities align with the climate. We ride bikes/trikes, we cross country ski, wife down hill skis, I sail an ice boat, we have a powerboat on Lake Michigan.
  • I thrive on sunshine, fresh air, and green (my favorite color). I grew up in St Louis and live near DC for 6 years. There was never enough sunshine at either place. I should have been a Floridian my whole life!

    I ride my trike, swim, and kayak. Yard work gets me outside also. More than anything, I like to sit outside with a cup of coffee and watch the sunrise.
  • I thrive on sunshine, fresh air, and green (my favorite color). I grew up in St Louis and live near DC for 6 years. There was never enough sunshine at either place. I should have been a Floridian my whole life!

    I ride my trike, swim, and kayak. Yard work gets me outside also. More than anything, I like to sit outside with a cup of coffee and watch the sunrise.

    Wow, you survived St. Louis summer humidity !!!! :)
  • I used to work downtown and lived in the south county area 17 miles away. For some reason, I chose to ride the bus to work one day. When I headed home, the temp was 104 and the bus had no A/C and was completely full. They opened the windows but the hot air blowing on you was even worse than just the heat. Somehow I recovered and went on to play a softball game that night. I was only in my early 20s and in very good shape. Oh, the good ole days!

    Believe me, the humidity is much worse in Florida than it ever was in St Louis!
  • I used to work downtown and lived in the south county area 17 miles away. For some reason, I chose to ride the bus to work one day. When I headed home, the temp was 104 and the bus had no A/C and was completely full. They opened the windows but the hot air blowing on you was even worse than just the heat. Somehow I recovered and went on to play a softball game that night. I was only in my early 20s and in very good shape. Oh, the good ole days!

    Believe me, the humidity is much worse in Florida than it ever was in St Louis!

    I've been to Gainesville, St. Augustine, The Cape and Naples in mid-June. Now that is humidity. :o When I was young and bullet proof I could've handled it, but not now. You take Florida and I'll take the Sonoran Desert. We're gonna sweat one way or the other aren't we? Happy pedaling. :D
  • I lived for a while in St. Mary's, GA. Pure Swamp, filled in partly to build a military base. I also spend a few weeks of summer in the keys. I'll take the keys, with their cool breezes and steady temp, any time.
  • The breezes are what make most of Florida tolerable. I feel them in my front yard and love them.

    I still don't understand how some other southern states were inhabited before Florida. Can you imagine Atlanta without A/C? There's a good reason they call it "Hot Lanta."
  • Summer is definitely over, although I was beginning to wonder. It was nearly 80F on Friday and just above freezing today, Monday. The winds have been howling everyday, and the forecast is to below freezing by the weekend. Finished that maintenance on Rover II today, so it's just pack up a few bits, and pieces, turn right at Superior, Wi and stop when I hit the Gulf. Here's what I did today; www.bentonabudget.blogspot.com
  • Summer Definitely Over! Does this look like the white sand beaches of PCB, Fl?
    https://photos.app.goo.gl/ui9RX9UKimfEVy2l1
    uyf9bzkdhulq.png
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