darn wind

edited October 19 in General Discussions
Did a group ride yesterday, 18 miles out and 18 back. Strong almost straight on head wind with 30 mph gusts on the return. We talked afterwards if it effected me on the Zoomer or them on bikes more. Consensus was it was tough on everyone. Areas where I could average 18 mph I struggled to maintain 9.5 mph and the bikes were not running away from be. The human torso is a big aerodynamic spoiler.

Comments

  • Fully understand. In my neck of the woods, winds are expected to be close to 20 mph today.....which in turn, is making me think about catching up on some household chores rather than pushing the pedals.
  • Yeah, I pay a lot of attention to the wind. I pedal and it feels like I'm getting nowhere. I lean my seat back more when winds are high. If it's too bad, household chores is definitely an option!
  • TCEd, I developed a plan riding on the Razorback Greenway in NW Arkansas. When it was windy I would choose to ride into the wind starting out when my legs were fresh and strong. On the return I was thankful to have the tailwind. I used that strategy a lot especially on longer rides. I hope your trail system is such that you can take advantage of that strategy.

    It is no fun riding into a stiff wind. Gearing down and crawling along is so frustrating.
  • eassist is the answer! Up a level and peddle on grinning!
  • null
    Not ready for Etrike yet but know the technology is great and somewhere down the road
  • null
    The girls wanted to have lunch at the mid point which forced us into the route we took. I complained all the way back.
  • Cross & head winds almost always here in this part of Idaho. Last ride was in between a head-on & cross wind coming from the east ... it's almost always from the west or north. Was easier on the way home although 20 degrees colder, and very dark.
  • Winds over about 8 knots here signal a weather event but I turned around Wednesday morning into a front coming in. I looked down to see if rear tire had gone flat in the turn!
  • Southbound wrote: »
    Winds over about 8 knots here signal a weather event but I turned around Wednesday morning into a front coming in. I looked down to see if rear tire had gone flat in the turn!

    LOL. Been there, wondered the same. :D
  • edited October 22
    The first time we rode the Leelanau Trail, we headed south from Sutton's Bay, not realizing that we were on a fair incline and also had a fair tailwind. We rode outbound for about six mile and then turned back to discover that the tailwind had help greatly on the incline, and then, even though we were declining, the headwind made the downhill ride more difficult than the outbound incline had been. :-)
  • The first time we rode the Leelanau Trail, we headed south from Sutton's Bay, not realizing that we were on a fair incline and also had a fair tailwind. We rode outbound for about six mile and then turned back to discover that the tailwind had help greatly on the incline, and then, even though we were declining, the headwind made the downhill ride more difficult than the outbound incline had been. :-)

    That's the one we were on but started from T.C. and turned around in Sutton Bay. So that long 3 mile incline was into the 30 mph gusting wind.
  • edited October 22
    I wondered if that was the trail to which you referenced, knowing that it is an 18 mile trail. We love that trail, have done it several times this summer. Thankfully, not once in a 30 mph wind. Me thinks, I have added a fourth item to research before starting a ride, that of wind and its direction. :-)

    The only misfortune we experienced on the Leelanau Trail was 8 miles in a pouring rain. Even though the temps were in the upper 70's, because of the downpour, we were very cold when we finally reached our truck in Sutton's bay. :-(
  • No rain poncho kit or canopy is going to keep you dry for 8 miles of pouring rain! You have my sympathy for that one. And there's really no place to get out of the rain on that trail, is there?!
  • Jrobiso2 wrote: »
    No rain poncho kit or canopy is going to keep you dry for 8 miles of pouring rain! You have my sympathy for that one. And there's really no place to get out of the rain on that trail, is there?!

    There are a couple outhouses :)
  • Maybe we need to have those sail kits - on windy days, break out the folding center post/mast, attach it (somehow), and raise the sail!
  • We did sit under a large thick pine tree for about fifteen minutes. Surprisingly, it provided very good cover. But, after fifteen minutes with the sky looking like it was going to continue for a lengthy period, my wife suggested we strike out and make a run for it. We did, got soaked and chilled to the bone. The rain stopped just as we arrived at our truck, eight miles later. :-( Then it got very steamy and hot. Funny part was that even with the temps close to 80, since we were so chilled we had the heater in the truck on full blast for about 20 minutes before the shakes subsided.
  • edited October 23
    There are 3 or 4 wineries very close to the trail that you can ride to and wait out the rain.
  • Jrobiso2 wrote: »
    Maybe we need to have those sail kits - on windy days, break out the folding center post/mast, attach it (somehow), and raise the sail!

    Check on YouTube for a bunch of videos on sails for trikes. I think I'd like to start with a small sail until I learned how to control the trike. At worst you might end up on your side being dragged in directions/places you didn't expect to go. (And with road rash you didn't want...ouch!) :#

    I read an article once about a guy who went across the country of Mongolia on a trike being pulled by a giant kite. Now that was an incredible feat. I think this is a partial clip:
  • Catch that kite on a semi and you'd probably solve your latency issues... LOL
  • Looks great there. And I see people using that on the ocean to surf all the time. But, cyclists would have a hard time finding a deserted area to even try that out. An e-assist motor may be a better option.

    When I woke this morning, the temp was 49 degrees but the winds are under 10 mph so I'm going out to ride. I haven't been in weather this cool in over 2 years. Wish me luck!
  • The weather forecaster last night said our Tucson temps should be returning to the 70s/80s which are what we should be seeing instead of the 90s we've been having recently. I'm ready to do longer rides. Yahooooo!
  • It was high 50s when I started and mid 60s when I finished. I wore sweat pants, long socks, a hoodie and a long sleeve t-shirt made of wicking fabric. I also wore Isotoner gloves made of the stretchy material with leather strips. They are great for gripping the handle bars. I was very comfortable and got 9 miles in. Sometimes I think riding in the colder is easier than the heat.
  • It was high 50s when I started and mid 60s when I finished. I wore sweat pants, long socks, a hoodie and a long sleeve t-shirt made of wicking fabric. I also wore Isotoner gloves made of the stretchy material with leather strips. They are great for gripping the handle bars. I was very comfortable and got 9 miles in. Sometimes I think riding in the colder is easier than the heat.

    Yes, I agree. Being able to peel off layers or ramp up layers is advantageous. I can carry whatever else I need in my trunk bag. Riding in the extreme heat really takes the strength out of me.
  • it's much easier to layer clothing and then fit the weather condition vs. going out dressed incorrectly.
  • Wisdom must float in the air up there in Traverse City, as you are so wise my friend. ;)
  • Damn. Now I see why the rich people flock to the southern areas in the Northern Winter months. Mostly rain here in this part of Idaho. Time to break out the trainer & see if I can practice the mandolin while pedaling in place.
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