Electric assist.

2»

Comments

  • The hub (or cassette) you have, and the range it provides is going to be a factor in the motor's ability to assist you. If the low range on your hub is different than someone else's, your results are going to be different than his would be.

    My Nexus-8 has a low GI range of about 12" so it has a fair ability to climb even with out the motor.

    As has been suggested, though, you are going to be a lot better served using a gear sensor with any motor, with that hub. The reason being, the SA generally requires you to reduce the load when you shift, to ensure it shifts correctly. (Just as an external gearing would be. There are types for each, IGH and External. Make sure you order the right one for your gear setup!)

    With a motor, that isn't going to unload unless you pause pedaling during your shifting. (Or tap the brakes, or some other method to interrupt the motor's output during the shift.) With the shift sensor, it reads the cable movement and treats it the same as a light tap on the brake handle would. (Lights the light, but doesn't apply the brake.) When the light lights up, it interrupts the motor for about 1/2 second to enable the hub to shift completely.

    If you buy the motor through Luna, they have motors with this sensor connector already installed. (Ask for this, though. They might have some that don't have the connector. Read the descriptions!) Any other branded Bafang is not going to have it unless the description specifically states it's there. Without this "third brake" connector, you need to buy a brake "Y" cable as I suggested above. I think I bought my "Y" from EM3V, but Luna has them now, I believe.

    It may even be possible to use another "Y" for supplying power to a working brake light. I've been toying with this idea for a while now, but can't seem to find a relay that has a 5V trigger voltage but handles 12V on the output side. (I've blown a few relays...) :(

    @PapaSkisNTrikes I hope your motor system works as you want it to. A lot of LBS's don't know much (or anything) about mid-drive motors other than some of the much bigger ones, in the 3KW range... There just doesn't seem to be a lot of market for many of the LBS's, or they are "purists" and not interested in the e-bike revolution that is happening now.

    Bafang motors are made in China and marketed mainly to Asia and Europe. They are picking up a lot more traction in the US, but there aren't a lot of US distributors. There were a lot of teething problems with US buyers early on. Companies like Luna went out on a limb and got a lot of these teething problems resolved. In other words, the Chinese company listened to the US market, and the results are the BBSHD motor.

    Luna Cycles has a direct factory pipeline from China. As a result, they have asked (and gotten) a few modifications that aren't available from other avenues. The third "brake" connector (actually they call it a shift sensor connector, but it is really nothing more than a brake signal.) is one of these modifications they have gotten. Another mod they asked for was the higher capacity MOSFETs all of the newer motors ship with. Luna even sells just the controller to modify an older motor to the better FETS for about $100.

    These guys sell a lot of these motors, know their stuff, and are a US based company, even though the motors are Chinese manufactured. I cannot praise them enough!

    If you are even remotely handy with tools, total time to mod a bike to electric could be done in a couple of hours. Maybe a bit more if you have to mount things like the dedicated brake handles, route the cabling cleanly, Put on cable extensions, etc. About the same amount of time to do this for a trike, unless you are doing a special build. (Like I did.)
  • I'm starting to think that buying the IGH version of the Rover was a mistake - too much stuff expects an external gear set. Maybe I should just switch to external.
  • I really like using the Nexus internal BUT, as you say, you have to work around it.
  • Externals also require you to unload a bit when you shift. And for that reason there is a gear shift sensor just for externals. (Second paragraph in my reply above mentioned them, too.)

    The only real advantage I can see for externals is, you can tailor make your gearing. IGH's have a lot of advantages, IMO.
  • Long Overdue Update.

    We had the Bionx D500 installed at our lbs on each of our Sportsters in January.

    Took a trip to Georgia in February for several days of riding the Silver Comet Trail. After 247 miles during that trip, we came home very satisfied with the performance of the e-assist.

    In March I learned that Bionx had filed bankruptcy. So sorry to hear that news.

    In late April we took another trip, this time to SE Minnesota, riding on several trails within that region. That experience, with 250 miles of riding, only served to add further to our satisfaction with the decision to add e-assist.

    It has been our experience that the addition of e-assist has increased our average miles per day as well as the average speed. Miles - 38 per day versus 26 previously.
    Average Speed - 13 versus just under 8 previously.

    We rarely use throttle mode, but rely almost totally on the variety of the four levels of peddle assist. Hill climbs are now an exercise to which we look forward. When climbing hills in level four of peddle assist, the thrust with each peddle stroke is nothing short of exhilarating. If applying enough peddle power, we can actually accelerate when climbing hills. Prior to the e-assist, my wife avoided hill climbs like the plague, and I didn't particularly enjoy them. Now she and I both literally look forward to the next hill. The Silver Comet Trail in Georgia and also the Sleeping Bear Heritage Trail in northern Michigan (lower peninsula) each have hills of 12%. Not a problem!

    Battery life - We've had two days in the 50 mile range, and have yet to exhaust the battery charge. The lowest we have reached is 26% left in the battery charge.

    We have no regrets, other than the news that Bionx has filed bankruptcy. These units are, in our experience, high quality and have given us nothing but pleasure.

    PapaSkisNTrikes
  • edited July 19
    Great update. Thanks for the post. It pretty much parallels my own experience but with a BBSO2B from Luna Cycle. Now about 25000km on my Rover w around 15000 w the eassist. Very few probs beyond standard maintenance. Great investment
  • Glad you are all so satisfied. What will you do if you need parts in the future?

    It's flat enough terrain here that I hope I don't need that for a long time.
  • Jump up and down, stomp my feet, throw my hands up, cry, then call our lbs to see what they suggest. :-)
  • edited July 23
    Long Overdue Update.

    We had the Bionx D500 installed at our lbs on each of our Sportsters in January.

    Took a trip to Georgia in February for several days of riding the Silver Comet Trail. After 247 miles during that trip, we came home very satisfied with the performance of the e-assist.

    In March I learned that Bionx had filed bankruptcy. So sorry to hear that news.

    In late April we took another trip, this time to SE Minnesota, riding on several trails within that region. That experience, with 250 miles of riding, only served to add further to our satisfaction with the decision to add e-assist.

    It has been our experience that the addition of e-assist has increased our average miles per day as well as the average speed. Miles - 38 per day versus 26 previously.
    Average Speed - 13 versus just under 8 previously.

    We rarely use throttle mode, but rely almost totally on the variety of the four levels of peddle assist. Hill climbs are now an exercise to which we look forward. When climbing hills in level four of peddle assist, the thrust with each peddle stroke is nothing short of exhilarating. If applying enough peddle power, we can actually accelerate when climbing hills. Prior to the e-assist, my wife avoided hill climbs like the plague, and I didn't particularly enjoy them. Now she and I both literally look forward to the next hill. The Silver Comet Trail in Georgia and also the Sleeping Bear Heritage Trail in northern Michigan (lower peninsula) each have hills of 12%. Not a problem!

    Battery life - We've had two days in the 50 mile range, and have yet to exhaust the battery charge. The lowest we have reached is 26% left in the battery charge.

    We have no regrets, other than the news that Bionx has filed bankruptcy. These units are, in our experience, high quality and have given us nothing but pleasure.

    PapaSkisNTrikes

    Going up that hill on the Heritage Trail at the Pierce Stocking Drive is a challenge and the road leading to it has a fair grade on it so you're a bit worn at the base of the climb. Once that hill is conquered it's a fun ride all the way to Empire. I wish they would have paved the trail section vs. crushed limestone in Port Onida north of Glen Arbor but the park wanted it to represent the era the farms were still occupied. I may have seen you and your wife going in the opposite direction earlier in July. I was riding with a group of bike riders and there was a LOT of traffic on the trail. ed
  • I do remember seeing a group of bike riders with one recumbent trike. Must have been you? I think I recall that we passed in opposite directions both ways. We were there on Saturday, July 7th. We stopped at Joe's Friendly Tavern in Empire for lunch.
  • That was us.
  • i know this is for a bike but would it work on a trike also?
    AW 26”x1.75” Rear wheel 48V 1000W Electric Bicycle Motor Kit E-Bike Cycling Hub Conversion Dual Mode Controller
  • on a rover a 26-inch would increase rear height, dip your nose, get the pedals closer to the ground and maybe open you up to heelstrike - put the rear wheel on a 3-inch block and check pedal ground clearance.
  • JamesR wrote: »
    on a rover a 26-inch would increase rear height, dip your nose, get the pedals closer to the ground and maybe open you up to heelstrike - put the rear wheel on a 3-inch block and check pedal ground clearance.

    Very good info thank you. Guess that settles that
  • TerraTrike told me to consider a 24" wheel rather than a 26" if I wanted a larger rear wheel. I left it as 20" wheel in the end.
Sign In or Register to comment.