Bad decisions

I'm not trying to start a fight with anyone but .................. it sure seems like a bunch of riders made a bad decision regarding the model they bought. I base this on all the posts from people wanting to upgrade the drive train and/or handling on their trike and with many not long after they bought it. This seems to be with Rover owner more than other models and I wonder with the changes they're considering and costs if it would have been better to have bought a different model initially.
Seems like many are disappointed with the ride comfort, handling, speed and/or range of gears available and in most cases a different model would have fixed the concerns.

Is this due to the rider not knowing what they're getting into ?
and
Are the dealers not informing riders correctly on the trikes performance based on the riders condition and expectations ?
or
Are the riders simply out of shape and think an upgrade will correct their condition ?

Me thinks it's the dealers not working with the customer in helping them understand the trikes limitations along with the buyers expectations and limitations.



Comments

  • No decision is a bad decision. There are many many things to learn about triking and which trikes. It matters not which model you choose, chances are there will be something you won't quite like. I started with a Rover two years ago and have had a ball, changing, adding, and deleting things. Should I have purchased a different model/options? Perhaps.

    No matter. Look all you like, but eventually you will have to fish or cut bait. I've been having a ball fishing while still looking for that trophy catch. 15000+km and it's still a blast
  • I would have changed out derailleurs and shifters on a Rambler just as I did on my Rover. Same thing with my Shimano Look pedals. Same thing with the brakes. Would have been nice to have an all welded, lighter frame. But square tubing frames has its virtues. If TT had offered hub brakes as an option, as ICE recumbent trike does I would have gone that route. If TT offered a trike with indirect steering like the Tour 2 I would have bought that one since I like the more forgiving slower steering over direct steering.
    I am not looking for speed in my Rover. My days of fast riding went bye bye when I got my medical issues. The Rover fits the bill to fulfill my cardiologist's prescribed exercise regimen along with long walks.
  • I bought the cheapest model that would handle my weight. I could have survived with the standard Rover but am so much happier with my upgrades.

    The misguided individuals who need more speed need to go back to riding a two wheeler. Trikes are so much safer and enjoyable to ride. Increasing their speeds would make just them dangerous.

    Terra Trike does not believe in customization which keeps their prices down. I agree with that and wouldn't have known what changes I wanted until I road the trike for a few years. Now that I've invested $1800 in the trike, I can't afford to purchase a new one. Besides, this one will probably last the rest of my life because it's a quality product with a lifetime guarantee!
  • I started with a Sun delta trike which I felt had too much wobble in the front wheel at any speed over a turtle’s pace. I researched trikes and bought my Traveler which has been nothing but pleasure to ride. I am considering an All Terrain just because it looks like so much fun and is also two inches higher for easier on and off. If I do buy the All Terrain, I will keep the Traveler as my traveling trike.
  • edited December 2017
    There is nothing wrong with wanting to go a little faster. Many seems to like mentioning how fast they go downhill. And yes I understand there are those that are happy riding at a slow pace and that is great also. There's plenty of room for everyone.
  • edited December 2017
    Mr.Bill5,
    You're not new to the game.
  • I bought the Rover because I weighed 370 pounds, so it was either the Rover or a Greenspeed Magnum XL.

    Was I going to shell out $4000 on the experiment that buying your first trike is? Uh, no. [I later learned about a Trident model for heavyweights, but the idea is the same - limited choices]

    So $1300 for an IGH Rover.

    Then I learned that my knees just couldn't handle anything over a 5% grade, even in the lowest gear of the Rover. I also learned that the seat frame construction, combined with a very recumbent position, literally dug holes in the back of my thighs. I learned that mirrors put on the handlebars were useless because I couldn't see them around my belly, plus they were in the reading section of my bifocals. I also learned that the standard handlebars were too skinny - my thighs rubbed the bars, even fully adjusted out. I got hot/numb foot and tried multiple solutions. I got hit in the back of the head by dog poop flung at me by my rear tire.

    I LEARNED.

    I MODIFIED. ADJUSTED. IMPROVED.

    So now my rover i8 has 24 gears (yeah, lots of overlap). I can handle pretty steep hills with the new smallest front ring without needing ice bags on my knees afterwords. I have wider bars. I have vertical add-ons to the handlebars (just because I like it). I added a wheelchair butt pad which solved the thigh issue (although later I got the new seat and it does well enough I don't need the butt pad any more). I added versa bars to attach my mirrors to, as well as 2 drink bottle holders and a cheap wired bike computer. I added a TT rack and a combo bag/pannier set from my lbs. I added fenders to stop the dog poop artillery and the underarm mud coating.

    So now I am a happy camper, satisfied with my ride. And my $1300 Rover now has probably $1850 in it (all those numb foot experiments were expensive) which includes SPD shoes and pedals. That's STILL a heck of a lot less than the Greenspeed Magnum XL (and who knows what mods it would have needed?).

    So please don't be negative about folks who want to alter their Rovers. For some of us, we had no choice on what to buy for our first trike.
  • Jrobiso2,
    Guess I didn't say things correctly. My thought was some people make a bad choice due to a dealer that doesn't help them make the correct choice initially, they just sell the rider a trike they have available. Obviously some riders lock in on the right trike due to their own research. Seems on the F.B. pages there are riders wanting to improve things soon after purchase and possibly the improvement would have been a different model to begin with.
  • Yeah, I can agree there - salesman will tell you that the model they have in stock is the perfect model for you. The only animal lower than a snake is a human salesperson.
  • That's because few salesmen have ever ridden a trike. Most are too young and think a trike is for old people. If I had discovered one in my twenties, I would not have had long periods with no riding and I'd probably be a lot thinner!
  • TCEd wrote: »
    Jrobiso2,
    Guess I didn't say things correctly. My thought was some people make a bad choice due to a dealer that doesn't help them make the correct choice initially, they just sell the rider a trike they have available. Obviously some riders lock in on the right trike due to their own research. Seems on the F.B. pages there are riders wanting to improve things soon after purchase and possibly the improvement would have been a different model to begin with.

    If one steps back and looks at the TT trikes as a whole versus Catlike versus ICE one will see the TT line is very price point driven. They all for the most part have bottom brackets lower than the seat heights. The biggest difference is the frame material. Components are very similar over all the models with the sportier models having pricier bits and pieces. Other trike manufacturers have different business models and they offer more radical layouts meaning bottom brackets lower than seat height to almost 8" higher. They typically have higher priced components which add a lot to the bottom line. And when you throw in weight limitations on different trikes you have another variable. And throw in folding trikes, suspensions, exotic metal frames. How does one determine what to buy?
    If you have never ride a trike before, or even a recumbent before you typically will go with models that are in your price range, feel somewhat comfortable test riding it, feel safe while riding them since recumbent riding is a whole other world compared to DF bikes. How does one determine what to buy?
    If you are a savvy buyer you would have done tons of research ahead of time. You would have joined this group ahead of time and ask lots of questions of the members. A lot of candid questions. I did this. I joined this group months before I spent $1 on parts, on a trike. I learned a lot from all the most learned riders and took that knowledge with my recumbent experience and took the plunge. I knew I was going to mod my Rover heavily over buying a different model. Do I regret it? Won't know till next spring when I do my first rides. I doubt it very much since I know I got excellent info from you fellow riders, got a trike that fits my budget even with all the $$ upgrading parts. The short 1.5 mile ride I took before I put it away for the season put a shitgrin on my face. Guess I got the right ride.
  • experience and research notwithstanding, takes ownership to decide if bad decision. for a current case of regret
    http://www.bentrideronline.com/messageboard/showthread.php?t=137528

    whoda thunk?

    agree with Miss Florida on dealer advice - next time you browse trikes at the lbs, ask if the sales person rides a trike to work.
  • Was no other affordable alternative.

    No matter what type of vehicle a person gets, they always want to upgrade it to get more performance, or customize to their surroundings and likes.

    Dealers. The only that I've been in contact with knew far less than i did at the time of purchase. That and they only had an i8 and x8 model, nothing else.

    ¬ ITL
  • I purchased a 2014 used Rover (i8 Nexus) in June 2016 for $600 after having not ridden any sort of bike for a quarter century. My wife was sure I was throwing away my money on something that would sit in our garage and not see any use after no more than a week or two. I bought it with the idea it would be great to silently ride up on and photograph wildlife along the Red Cedar River near my home. I read that the Rover could be converted into a tandem trike, and this became a secondary goal, so my wife and I might ride together.

    Once I decided I wanted a trike, I began to do the research. I discovered this TT Forum early in the process, and boy have I been so grateful ever since. I "trolled" for months soaking up tidbits of information from the marvelous banter of Forum participants. After several months I chimed in with my first question. I was immediately welcomed into the fold. It just might be, that how freely and helpfully everyone here shares what they know and/or believe, that sealed my love for all things trike.

    I bought my wife a used TT Traveler (i8 SRAM) in September, 2016. I decided there and then that my personal next trike would also fold. Last winter, I installed a Bafang BBSHD on the Rover. I'm sure that having the assist helped me reach my goal of 1000 miles this summer. I loved learning about trikes with the Rover. Now that it has assist, I am closer to converting it to a tandem trike. Still looking for a new/used Rover tandem kit if anyone wants to sell one.

    Today I purchased a used 2016 Catrike 559 with a Rohloff Speed Hub and a Schlumpf High Speed Drive, Power Grips, wrists rests, padded seat, dual mirrors, headrest, three
    fenders, twist shifter, and a rear rack, for $2600. Yes, Christmas came early. If all goes to plan, my wife will get the Nuvinci N380 and the Efneo GTRO installed on her trike this winter. Next year we will have two folding trikes we can travel with.

    So, is the 559 the trike I really always wanted? No. Ideally I'd like to have a trike with suspension that folds and includes a Rohloff and an Efneo GTRO. Am I sure that's what I ultimately want? Sure... this week! ;)
  • JamesR wrote: »
    experience and research notwithstanding, takes ownership to decide if bad decision. for a current case of regret
    http://www.bentrideronline.com/messageboard/showthread.php?t=137528

    whoda thunk?

    agree with Miss Florida on dealer advice - next time you browse trikes at the lbs, ask if the sales person rides a trike to work.

    I read the whole story you linked to. I used to work in a company that made huge liquified natural gas equipment and once in awhile these huge aluminum beasties would fail. Almost every time the failure was right next to a weld in the heat effected zone. The repair would address the design flaw. My first recumbent was an Infinity which had an aluminum frame. It failed in the rear section next to a weld, in the heat effected zone. The repair was a welded crosspiece and led eventually to a design change of the rear triangle by Infinity. It is interesting in how Ian at Greenspeeed tried to pass the buck on the trike frame failure when once again the failure was the frame welders fault and possibly a design flaw.
    The owner of that very expensive trike has to choose between keeping the repaired frame trike or unloading it for another and for his piece if mind. In his case it wasn't the trike was not fast enough, it was a matter that the trike was not safe enough.
  • This is a very interesting thread. All valid points of view, particularly when placed alongside each ones perspective. I agree that the more research one can put in prior to purchase, lessens the possibility of "buyers remorse." I would also agree that the lbs can be a big advantage, or disadvantage, depending on experience displayed. The first lbs with whom we talked regarding a recumbent trike said that it was a "passing fad." I feel luckily fortunate to have found the lbs with whom we (wife and I) ultimately made our purchase. The lbs owner rides a variety of recumbents and DFs every Monday evening through the Michigan outdoor ridable months. His experienced helped in answering the multitude of question we brought forth. Additionally, we enjoyed an all day demo ride of several makes and models which helped immensely in narrowing our purchase choice. Our choice of the Sportster in the 30x model has been very satisfying. Is it perfect? I don't think there is such an animal. There are always some trade offs, but overall, we have been very happy. While we haven't accumulated the mileage that some do, we did manage 1,100 miles this past summer, and that has only helped to confirm our satisfaction with our choice.
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