Reduce rolling resistance

edited November 2011 in Rover
My Rovers tires are about shot. Since there is very little outside riding time left here in Ohio, I'll have time to research a way to better my riding experience for next Spring. I plan to purchase several accessories ( trainer for winter, rear fender, rack, bags) but what I most want to do is to find more puncture resistant tires that also reduce rolling resistance. To do this I would think going to a narrower, high pressure tire would help to do this. Any suggestions.
8000 miles and counting...

Comments

  • I like my Schwalbe Marathon With Kevlarguard 100psi
    I run them at 85psi a softer ride at 85psi
    “May the road rise up to meet you, may the wind be ever at your back. May the sun shine warm upon your face and the rain fall softly on your fields. And until we meet again, May God hold you in the hollow of his hand.”
  • What is the narrowest tire we can put on our Rovers? I would think less contact area would also reduce rolling resistance.
    8000 miles and counting...
  • There is some debate about narrower meaning less resistance, although logic would indicate that to be true. I got Big Apple tires for my Rover and the wife's Rambler. I got them two reasons, added puncture protection and better ride. They can go between 35-70 lb of pressure and you can adjust it to get the ride you want. They are kind of like mini shock absorpers. Where they are a "fatter" tier than say Marathons, on BROL, some have run test that indicate an improved mph and less resistance than thinner tires in the same price range.

    I am certainly no expert, have only run the BAs, but I am very pleased with mine...
    Arasgrandpa
    Rover 8
    Olympia, WA (Summer)/Chandler, AZ (Winter)
    www.tommymartin.info - Blog
  • For what it is worth I have Marathons on my Path and no appreciable wear at about 1000 miles. They will go up to 100 psi, which makes noticeably less rolling resistance than lower pressures.
  • I have found that over pressuring the tires on my Rover results in a really harsh ride with a slight increase in speed. To me, the speed increase isn't worth the sacrifice I would have to make in riding comfort especially on rough pavement or chipseal. YMMV....
  • The question: What is the narrowest tire I can use? Some where on this forum, and I can't find it quickly, someone i thought was going to use the Kayak tire, which if I remember correctly was 1.10 in. wide. I was told by the wrench at the LBS that 1.25in was the narrowest I could go. I will have to do a search and see if the rider installing the Kayak tires has them installed and if he has any problems with such a narrow tire. The wrench said that a tire that narrow may not seat the bead. The stock Rover wheel is 1" wide. I would think that a tire made with a side wall straight would seat, but I am not a tire expert. I also think the more narrow and the higher pressure the less rolling resistance. The wrench at the LBS said that if I went to high pressure tires I would see a big difference in the rolling resistance and that I would really like it.
    Isn't it fun messing about trikes?
    Bill
  • The question: What is the narrowest tire I can use? Some where on this forum, and I can't find it quickly, someone i thought was going to use the Kayak tire, which if I remember correctly was 1.10 in. wide. I was told by the wrench at the LBS that 1.25in was the narrowest I could go. I will have to do a search and see if the rider installing the Kayak tires has them installed and if he has any problems with such a narrow tire. The wrench said that a tire that narrow may not seat the bead. The stock Rover wheel is 1" wide. I would think that a tire made with a side wall straight would seat, but I am not a tire expert. I also think the more narrow and the higher pressure the less rolling resistance. The wrench at the LBS said that if I went to high pressure tires I would see a big difference in the rolling resistance and that I would really like it.
    Isn't it fun messing about trikes?
    Bill

    Are you sure it is Kayak, or might it be Kojak?
  • I have the kojak 20X1.35s. It seems to be a 1+mph difference after two ten mile runs. Not conclusive though as the nuvinci hub alows me to keep a more constant cadence. Probably the combo.....
  • tigerpaw wrote:
    I have the kojak 20X1.35s. It seems to be a 1+mph difference after two ten mile runs. Not conclusive though as the alows me to keep a more constant cadence. Probably the combo.....

    Those are supposed to be the best tires for speed according to UT. Is the ride much stiffer due to the high pressure?
  • Honestly, i haven't noticed any difference between the stock tire and the kojaks. Again, only twentyish miles on the new tires; but with the new hub the overall ride is much smoother. Probably the ability to tweak the sweet spot for spinning along with less rolling resistance.
    Could be i've been so focused on learning the new hub i haven't paid much attention to the ride. :)
  • Must be kojak.
  • The theory is a skinny tire will have less rolling resistance. And/or, a higher pressure tire will have less rolling resistance. Over on BROL (BentRiders OnLine), there have been many many threads about tires, speed, and rolling resistance.

    The conclusion for the most part seems to be that skinny tires *are* faster, *IF* you don't hit any bumps. When one rides on less-than-perfect roads, or on unpaved MUPs (multi-use paths), a good quality wider tire deflects easier over the rough spots, causing a lower rolling resistance on a less-than-perfect surface.

    I bought my Rover with 100PSI Marathons (1.75"), and later switched to Big Apples (2.00"). I personally found that when inflated to their max of 70PSI, They were slightly faster than the Marathons at 100PSI. Plus, the ride was way better. Since then, I have been keeping my BAs inflated to 60PSI for even greater comfort with no loss of speed that I can notice.

    There is a minor trade-off between comfort and speed, at least on the front end. Ashley at UTT (Utah Trikes) swears by Kojaks on the front end for the best in performance, where comfort and fl@t protection is less important than all-out speed and performance are concerned.

    I do not ride my Rover for speed - neither my Rover, nor myself are built for speed. I know that I am slow, but I do not want to be any slower than I need to be. The Big Apple tires are the most comfortable tire you can get, period. It also is *one* of the fastest on less-than-perfect surfaces. It's fl@t protection is only second to the 'Marathon Plus' tire, which happens to be both stiff, and slow.

    The stock rims are 19mm from inner edge to inner edge. So any tire over 1" should bead-up for you. But I would consider what you are actually chasing after here? Is it speed at any cost? Or simply the best all-around tire? How important is it to you to have front fenders that fit well without rubbing? While a few have succeeded in getting their fenders to work with 2" BAs, most including myself have found that you must choose one over the other.

    Also, your weight as the rider may come into play as well. Are you a big or little rider? You do want to make sure that you do not have too much sidewall deflection, this is based on both tire pressure, and rider weight. All my knowledge is based on a 300+ pound rider weight.
    ---
    Peter_C
    TerraTrike Rover W/N360 by NuVinci
    http://s1103.photobucket.com/albums/g475/Peter_CC/Peter_C Trike Album/
    
    (copy and paste into your browser) to see ---> My Trike Photos
    ---
  • After riding my Catlike Expedition (I do have a Rover Tandem on order) for a year commuting to work and back I have concluded that Big Apples are the best for my use. I started with Marathon Racers and went to Kojaks which while they spin up faster than anything else, they also loose speed just as fast when hitting a bump. The big apples take just slightly longer to get up to speed but they hold the speed once there.

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