Front IGH?

What is a Schlumph front igh? $800 at Utah Trike. Dependable? Helper for hills, higher speeds? Thanks, from the brain dead Finlander.

Comments

  • Just like a Patterson, more expensive, but does have larger gear inch depending on which model you get. Better gear inch range helps with speed, but the biggest factor is the person peddling the trike. Switching gear on it is hitting a button in the center with your heal. You will also have to make an adjustment where the crank goes in to make it fit.
  • single-ring gearbox. to give the rover more range: patterson 16 speeds($300), schlumph 16 speeds ($800), efneo 24 speeds ($500).

    from way-back minnesota days - norweigians told polish jokes, poles told finnlander jokes. tis rumored finn farmers tended to have poor harvests because they tended to usually over-water their taconite plants. norweigians, on the other hand, didnt know about mannerheim.

    my humble, finland is probaby the most civilized country in the world, high-speed internet being a constitutional right. not to mention producing linus thorvalds. told my daughter to considering shipping the grandkids off to finland for a decent affordable education when they leave high school.

    tomorrow, by the way: http://www.rrfi.fi/en/
  • The Patterson works great, especially on large hills. I proved it last weekend. I just wish there wasn't so much repeat in the high and low gear. But, I do know you can modify the gears when you buy it. The others would have to be outstanding to pay that much more.
  • edited August 3
    JamesR wrote: »
    single-ring gearbox. to give the rover more range: patterson 16 speeds($300), schlumph 16 speeds ($800), efneo 24 speeds ($500).

    from way-back minnesota days - norweigians told polish jokes, poles told finnlander jokes. tis rumored finn farmers tended to have poor harvests because they tended to usually over-water their taconite plants. norweigians, on the other hand, didnt know about mannerheim.

    my humble, finland is probaby the most civilized country in the world, high-speed internet being a constitutional right. not to mention producing linus thorvalds. told my daughter to considering shipping the grandkids off to finland for a decent affordable education when they leave high school.

    tomorrow, by the way: http://www.rrfi.fi/en/

    Finland has serious problems. One of the highest suicide rates in western Europe and alcoholism kills more people then heart disease and cancer combined. My wife had a high school exchange student from Finland that was escorted out of the USA by homeland security , he turned out to be a aspiring drug dealer back in Finland and his parents got rid of him by placing him as a exchange student, common practice with wealthy Europeans.
  • I have no experience with a Patterson, and have only heard good things about them. I have a Schlumpf High Speed Drive on my Catrike. Schlumph actually makes at least 3 different bottom bracket (trike front) hubs- a mountain drive (2.5 x reduction in each of your rear gears), a so called high-speed (2.5 x increase for each of your rear gears), and a high-speed drive (1.6 x increase for each of the rear gears). This one is essentially, the same as the Patterson. Reportedly, the Schlumpf is stronger and more durable than the Patterson, but I have not heard of any issues with the Schlumpf or Patterson.

    The Patterson, Schlumpf High-Speed Drive, and the Schlumpf Speed Drive all increase the higher end of your gear inches. Only the Schlumpf Mountain Drive increases the low end gearing and gear inches, making hill climbing a piece of cake (as long as you are not in a hurry).

    Two things worth noting: TerraTrike has the Schlumpf Speed Drive (regularly $700) on sale for $400. The second thing to note is that the Schlumpf requires the bottom bracket to be slightly cambered (widened) which a good local bike shop can easily do in 15 minutes or less. And for reference, this is not a problem if you ever want to use a standard bottom bracket it the future. It just requires an small inexpensive piece to be added.

    And a final note, perhaps most appealing yet, the new kid on the block, the Efeno GTRO, is an internal ($500) triple bottom bracket instead of the double internal Patterson or Schlumpf.

    My personal experience tells me that a Schlumpf mountain drive would be great for use with most trikes and older, less fit, trike riders. as most of us struggle on the hills.
  • Aye, Efneo has equivalent of 3 chainrings in one unit. A big plus for that one, as more gear range! Think they have a US distributor now too.

    ¬ ITL
  • Trident Trikes in Tennessee is a US distributer for the Efeno. I would agree with Idaho TrailLizard if the Efeno and be setup so that you have one, more or less, standard equivalent front ring, one equivalent smaller front ring, and one equivalent larger front ring. If all the gain is in the upper gear range, these drives will do little for you other than let you traverse a whole parking lot in a single crank stroke.

    If you can't spin-out approaching a cadence of 90 or so, adding more high end gearing won't do much for sustained speed or endurance... just the opposite. If you can spin-out on the flats with your current gearing, then they have the potential to help with endurance and top end speed.
  • I spun out in grass near a baseball diamond recently but not on pavement.
  • With the Efeno you cannot switch gears under load you will need to pause when you switch gears. TT had a Sportser with one at Riderfest. Talking to the one guy from TT outside of the pause when you shift, which is not really a big deal, it is a good crank.
  • Peanut wrote: »
    Just like a Patterson, more expensive, but does have larger gear inch depending on which model you get. Better gear inch range helps with speed, but the biggest factor is the person peddling the trike. Switching gear on it is hitting a button in the center with your heal. You will also have to make an adjustment where the crank goes in to make it fit.
    I have no experience with a Patterson, and have only heard good things about them. I have a Schlumpf High Speed Drive on my Catrike. Schlumph actually makes at least 3 different bottom bracket (trike front) hubs- a mountain drive (2.5 x reduction in each of your rear gears), a so called high-speed (2.5 x increase for each of your rear gears), and a high-speed drive (1.6 x increase for each of the rear gears). This one is essentially, the same as the Patterson. Reportedly, the Schlumpf is stronger and more durable than the Patterson, but I have not heard of any issues with the Schlumpf or Patterson.

    The Patterson, Schlumpf High-Speed Drive, and the Schlumpf Speed Drive all increase the higher end of your gear inches. Only the Schlumpf Mountain Drive increases the low end gearing and gear inches, making hill climbing a piece of cake (as long as you are not in a hurry).

    Two things worth noting: TerraTrike has the Schlumpf Speed Drive (regularly $700) on sale for $400. The second thing to note is that the Schlumpf requires the bottom bracket to be slightly cambered (widened) which a good local bike shop can easily do in 15 minutes or less. And for reference, this is not a problem if you ever want to use a standard bottom bracket it the future. It just requires an small inexpensive piece to be added.

    And a final note, perhaps most appealing yet, the new kid on the block, the Efeno GTRO, is an internal ($500) triple bottom bracket instead of the double internal Patterson or Schlumpf.

    My personal experience tells me that a Schlumpf mountain drive would be great for use with most trikes and older, less fit, trike riders. as most of us struggle on the hills.

    Even though I've been triking only a month, I've found I have no use for the first 5 of the 8 gear ratios my Rover came with, and spend my whole ride in the upper 3 ratios, using the lowest only when starting from a dead stop. I have seen some discussions about putting a larger diameter rear wheel, but am not sold on that as it would change the stance of my trike, and I would have to recalculate my computer, new fenders, move rack etc. etc.etc.
    I spoke with a guy at a Chicago recumbent shop about it, and he recommended the Schlumpf High Speed Drive. He said he has one, and they are super. I'd get two new lower ratios, but six new higher. So....I've ordered one and am on the waiting list to get it and they're going to install it for me. I can't wait.
  • I have a Schlumpf drive on a cruiser bike that's hardly ever used. I was thinking about moving the Schlumpf drive to a trike. Since there are 3 different versions of the Schlumpf drive, is there a way to tell them apart. The one I have doesn't have any markings that I can see and it's version is not mentioned in the bikes documentation.
  • Mountain = many lower gears. Speed = some low, some higher. High Speed = a couple low, many higher.
  • I have a single speed bike with a Schlumpf drive. Two gear ranges with the Schlumpf high and low. Are there any markings on the drives? Does the mountain drive look any different externally from the speed drive?
  • dunno markings or appearance.

    flip the bike upside down and compare number of wheel rotations per a single crank rotation to get an approximation of low-high speed ratios.
  • I have a Schlumpf drive on one of my trikes and rarely use it. It stays on the standard size ring 99% of the time. I believe it is better to develop a high cadence at whatever gear/gearing one uses. 3.5 years ago my cadence was roughly 60, the following year I got my average up to 70, then 75-80 last year, and I am struggling to get it closer to 90. It currently hovers in the 75-83 RPM level. I hope yours gets more use than mine. I'm still working on the organic motor side of things.
  • Birder, you're right. Perhaps getting our engines in tune may be the best mod of all.
  • Windy and misting when we peddled last evening. She quit after 4 miles into the wind and then 4 back to the truck. I went past about 3/4 mile with tailwind and got it to 18.7. Coming back into a quartering headwind I did 14.4 mph til the heart attack. The 18.7 I was pumping so hard the Trike was all over the path. Wish I had a high gear to smooth everything out but keep the apples up there. Then I’d have to stop for 15 min and wait for my wife. :)
  • I don’t know. I have one hill that requires I drop down to the smaller ring on my Patterson crank. I can avoid it but eAch time I take that hill it gets better and that lower gear gives me a fighting chance. I love my Patterson crank. I just wish there were totally different gears on each crank gear. I go from 1st on the high gear to 5th on the low gear. So I have about 12 gears instead of 16.
  • I have a Schlumpf drive on one of my trikes and rarely use it. It stays on the standard size ring 99% of the time. I believe it is better to develop a high cadence at whatever gear/gearing one uses. 3.5 years ago my cadence was roughly 60, the following year I got my average up to 70, then 75-80 last year, and I am struggling to get it closer to 90. It currently hovers in the 75-83 RPM level. I hope yours gets more use than mine. I'm still working on the organic motor side of things.


    I was amazed at Ridefest watching/hearing how much riders were changing gears on that relatively flat route except for one hill near the end. Seemed like they were chasing gears versus settling in and riding at a steady cadence. ed
  • lots less shifting if one works on engine rather than hardware upgrades.

    might take a few years but going from a 60 to 90 rpm cadence with the x8 rover will raise top end from about 12 to 18 mph. much heart-healthier than fancy gearing provided one does not pedal into a heart attack.

    of course, appropriate gearing for the riding environment makes all the difference as far as enjoying spinning the pedals goes. hill climbing at the riderfest must have been an ordeal for the x8 folks at 24 gear-inches compared to Miss Florida's 18 g.i.
  • I have a Schlumpf drive on one of my trikes and rarely use it. It stays on the standard size ring 99% of the time. I believe it is better to develop a high cadence at whatever gear/gearing one uses. 3.5 years ago my cadence was roughly 60, the following year I got my average up to 70, then 75-80 last year, and I am struggling to get it closer to 90. It currently hovers in the 75-83 RPM level. I hope yours gets more use than mine. I'm still working on the organic motor side of things.

    I am wondering how you count rpm's. In your head or do you have a computer? I am wanting to keep track of stuff like time, distances,heart rate, rpm's etc, etc, but my computer doesn't have that feature. Basically it's a fancy speedometer.
    I live in central Illinois, and EVERYTHING you've heard about Illinois topography is TRUE. FLAT AS A PANCAKE ON A POOL TABLE. View to the horizon is 20miles. We're at 720 ft above seal level. Unless you're at the river, or way southern Ill, IT'S FLAT!!! Coasting is an unknown. Climbing is saved for trees.

  • You guys just don't understand the difference between pedaling fast with your skinny legs and my muscular ones. Don't laugh! Really, I am so glad my knees work again. I don't want to wear them out any faster than I need to. Instead, I will wear out my wrist shifting more often. Just my choice!
  • I hear ya, Florida. Am in 7th gear a lot, unless on the return trip where I like to lay back and get home when I do. This cadence thing, mon, if I had to pace myself like that I'd be wore out in a mile.

    <- No spider legs here!

    Even with a slower cadence, as I really never paid much attention to it, I ride around 10 MPH or so. On sidewalks, mah, 6 MPH with all those car ramps across the walks, am level, then leaning, level, leaning - repeat.

    ¬ ITL
  • Good thing about establishing a good cadence is it will help prevent mashing which is bad on your ankles, knees and hips.
  • SteveR asks:

    "I am wondering how you count rpm's. In your head or do you have a computer? I am wanting to keep track of stuff like time, distances,heart rate, rpm's etc, etc, but my computer doesn't have that feature. Basically it's a fancy speedometer."

    There are several way to get there. I use my cell phone with the "Map My Ride" (MMR) app. I have a Garmin cadence sensor that fastens to my crank arm with a silicon-rubber band. Having read about some people braking their band and losing their sensor, I added a zip-tie to mine. I have to setup the sensor in the app before each ride. It works, but it's far from a perfect solution. I have a Garmin watch that has a decent heart rate monitor. The app can keep track of heart rate from a watch like mine, or a Garmin heart rate sensor, but Garmin's heart sensor is a chest sensor- Quite uncomfortable, IMHO.

    I think most cyclists choose the Strava cycling app over the MMR app. I started with MMR, and Strava looked fine once I finally checked it out, but I was already familiar with MMR, and it did everything I needed at that time.

    I have started looking for a good cycling computer or perhaps a good power meter. It would be nice to find one piece of equipment to do it all.

    Anyone know of such a beast?
  • Had Schlumpf "High Speed" drives on the two Cattrikes that we traded in a few months back. Really liked them. Had a lower low and a higher high than I have on my Tandem Pro. One really nice thing about them is that you can shift them at a standstill.

    Come down a hill and stop, and forget you are still in high range. Just push the little button on the crank with your heal, and presto, you are in low range. Now the bad thing (with the High Speed version) is that the difference between low and high is 2.5:1. This means that there are times (maybe a lot) that when you go from high to low or low to high, you may have to backshift as many as 4 gears, depending on how you time it.

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