Securing Your Trike

edited August 10 in Rover
When y'all stop to eat, take pictures, shop or just walk around to sight-see and smell the roses, do you lock your trikes? If so, what do you use and how do you prefer to secure it? I was looking at a thread started by Idaho about his cargo rack, and YamiYuki showed a picture of their rack that looked like a U-Bolt lock hanging down from the framework behind the seat.
As to the type of lock, an old-time bicycle repair guy once told me that all bikes weigh about the same, because a 49# bike only needs a 1# lock, while a 5# bike needs a 45# lock. That, plus he also said any standard locking system is only there to "keep an honest man honest". On my DF bikes, I always used a cable with a combination lock, and while the U-bolt probably gives more security, it is much more heavy, so there's that trade-off.
Anyway, I often see people in videos getting off their bikes and trikes while out on their rides, and wondered if they secure them or not. One friend that rides with her 2-wheel roadie friends, told us that when they are planning a ride with meal, shopping and sight-seeing stops, they ride their older, spare bikes, lol. Since I'm an old married guy hoping to retire next summer, I haven't been able to afford a first, primary trike yet, let alone a spare trike, so there goes that idea, lol.

Comments

  • If I'm more then a few feet away I lock my trike, How depends on the situation I'm in. If I'm just going in somewhere for a short stop I'll settle for running the lock through the rear wheel above the frame, otherwise I put it on a post with the crossbar. Some times that's not possible so I pull the cable out of the seat and run it around something to the rear wheel like I mentioned before.
  • edited August 10
    Have used a cable lock at church, and run locks through the end loops to the disc brakes.

    Cable is only good as a 'bare minimum' protection, which can be defeated by a pair of dikes/wire cutters. Cables are a bundled twisting of smaller cables, which can be nipped away.

    Locking to the disc brake means that even if the thief got through the cable they would have to use bolt cutters to get the locks off the disc brakes. Locking to the disc brakes means they won't be riding off if they only defeat the cable. - Local police recommend the disc padlock idea.

    Kryptonite recommended their higher-end chains on both sides to lock through the stabilizers on the older Rovers and through the wheels, and then a U lock for the rear wheel, boom, through the rack, onto a post of some sort.

    Even if you had a simple cable and locked to the disc brakes that does not prevent someone from lifting the trike into the back of a pickup and dealing with that at their leisure.

    There was a wireless cycle alarm called Cycle Chimp, but its effective range was minimal. When out of range the alarm triggered.

    There is no sure way to lock up, although Kryptonite does have an anti-theft insurance that comes with their locks. Unknown if 3 locks means triple the insurance or not - doubtful.

    However, Kryptonite's Mini Messenger looks interesting. Oh, and not all hardened chain links are created equal.
    Oh, and Kryptonite said the chains can be linked together. Still, the chains are heavy, and adds weight to the trike.

    In the past I used a pair of handcuffs to lock wheels to the frame on the MTB, but now just about everyone has a handcuff key on their keyrings.

    ¬ ITL
  • I used 2 U bolts and 2 cables to lock my trike on my Alpaca carrier on my trip to Michigan. I usually don't stop on rides because I don't want to risk the trike getting stolen but I do carry the locks with me.

    No one can carry the trike away. If you put a U bolt through the back wheel and above the frame, they can't ride it. Their only option would be to pick up the back wheel and roll it away and that would surely raise questions from onlookers.

    I like the Rover because you can lock the trike at the front frame cross bars if you can get a U bolt through it and around a pole at the same time.
  • I have left it alone on rare occasions when using a port a let alongside the trail. I did buy a Kryptonite chain lock when we stayed on Mackinac Island a couple of years ago. DF’s then. Heavy item. It sits in my back porch now. I use it when we take the kayaks on a trip. Lock em to the trailer.
  • When I ride, never away for long and always try to stay in visual with trike. Otherwise, cable lock thick enough that thief must carry heavy duty cable cutters(like bolt cutter). I think a tracker chip could work? Most times, my dog goes with too, so audio alarm and teeth work well also. Just make sure doogy-doo bags are with you. LOL!
  • We left our trikes in trailer last night for the first time. Locked them together with the Kryptonite chain. Tarp covered the trikes. Out of sight, out of mind, so they say. The are still there this am. Guud thing.
  • If you want total piece of mind, I recommend using a three pronged approach to securing our trikes-
    1) Get a separate rider on your homeowners insurance policy for 100% new replaceable value with zero deductible (shouldn't be more than $25/yr per thousand dollars of value.
    2) Use any decent 6' cable and combination lock- just to keep honest folks honest.
    3) Consider some sort of tracking device such as: https://smile.amazon.com/AMERICALOC-GL300W-Mini-Portable-Tracker/dp/B0197FV8YU/ref=sr_1_5?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1534262233&sr=1-5&keywords=Bike+Trackers

    Personally, I just use the first two methods listed above for all 3 of our trikes. It cost me less than $75/yr collectively to cover all three trikes with 100% new trike replacement value and zero deductible. I have all my camera gear insured the same way. And everything is covered for accidental loss or damage as well.
  • I agree on having a insurance rider as the primary way to protect your trike and a cable lock as backup. I know trikes get stolen but I also believe it is a very infrequent event probably done by kids as a novelty not someone trying to profit. Most trikes/bikes with some form of clip pedals will not be pedaled away since the thief needs the necessary shoes to pedal quickly. A grab and snatch needs a pickup truck or van, thief cannot predict if the trike will fit in a car or suv. I'm willing to bet serious money most trikes are stolen from the home/property/garage vs a coffee shop/store etc. I just park unlocked next to a bunch of bikes assuming a thief wants them not a trike. ed
  • TCEd wrote: »
    I agree on having a insurance rider as the primary way to protect your trike and a cable lock as backup. I know trikes get stolen but I also believe it is a very infrequent event probably done by kids as a novelty not someone trying to profit. Most trikes/bikes with some form of clip pedals will not be pedaled away since the thief needs the necessary shoes to pedal quickly. A grab and snatch needs a pickup truck or van, thief cannot predict if the trike will fit in a car or suv. I'm willing to bet serious money most trikes are stolen from the home/property/garage vs a coffee shop/store etc. I just park unlocked next to a bunch of bikes assuming a thief wants them not a trike. ed

    LOL! Kinda like the thief who steals/car-jacks a car only to find it has a standard transmission and they don't know how to drive it.
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